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Manger ep. 1, Quiz 45: mais que nenni

    This is French in real life. Hear “sauf”, “en pleine croisade”, “que nenni”, and “ben nous” in one clip just 15 seconds long. Can you hear and understand them all? Start at any level and improve your listening skills. Listen with us whether you’re prepping for the DALF or just starting at A1.

    This clip is from Manger Episode 1. Listen and fill in what you hear below. Read more and find a translation below. Listen to the full episode here.

    13 seconds, 51 words

    This audio sample and transcription is from Manger ep. 1. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode

    ',,, -.,, : ", ' -"
    qu'en,tradition,, -auraitpupleinecroisadeprocéréales.quenenni,,toutemodestie : ",apprendreque 'que -"
    Sauf qu'en,grossetraditionpain,beurre,confiture -auraitpuarrêterenpleinecroisadeprocéréales.quenenni,sontdit,entoutemodestie : "Ben,valeurapprendreceque c'estqueVRAI -"

    But certainly not

    This phrase is chockful of interesting expressions. Both in colloquial expressions, but also in grammar constructions. Who knew 51 words in just 15 seconds could have so much going on.

    What’s opening up for you in this clip?

    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    Sauf qu’en France, on a une grosse tradition pain, beurre, confiture au petit-déjeuner et ça aurait pu arrêter les Américains en pleine croisade pro céréales. Mais que nenni, ils se sont dit, en toute modestie : “Ben nous, on va leur apprendre aux Français ce que c’est que le VRAI petit-déjeuner.”

    Except that in France, we have a big tradition of bread, butter and jam for breakfast and that could have stopped the Americans in the middle of their pro-cereal crusade. But nonsense, they said to themselves, in all modesty: “Well, we’re going to teach the French what a REAL breakfast is.”

    The above translation from Deepl. Source

    What does “sauf” mean?

    “Sauf” is a French word that translates to “except” or “unless” in English. Here’s some information about its meaning, usage, and related details:

    Meaning: “Sauf” is used to introduce an exception or exclusion to a general statement or rule. It indicates that something or someone is excluded from what is mentioned or expected. It can also express a condition that must be met in order for the statement to be true.

    Usage:

    1. Exception: “Tout le monde était présent à la réunion, sauf Pierre.” (Everyone was present at the meeting, except Pierre.)
    2. Condition: “Je viendrai te rendre visite, sauf si j’ai un imprévu.” (I will come to visit you, unless I have an unforeseen event.)
    3. Exclusion: “Nous avons goûté à tous les plats, sauf au dessert.” (We tasted all the dishes, except for the dessert.)

    Examples:

    1. “Tout le monde aime cette chanson, sauf moi.” (Everyone likes this song, except me.)
    2. “J’adore tous les sports, sauf le football.” (I love all sports, except football.)
    3. “Elle est d’accord avec toutes les idées, sauf une.” (She agrees with all the ideas, except one.)

    Notes:

    • “Sauf” is often used in combination with other words or phrases to indicate the specific exception or condition.
    • It can be used in various contexts, such as in conversations, written texts, or formal discussions.
    • In some cases, “sauf” can be synonymous with “excepté” or “à l’exception de,” but it is more commonly used in everyday language.

    Overall, “sauf” is a versatile word that helps to indicate exceptions or exclusions in French sentences, allowing for more precise communication and clarification.

    What does “une grosse tradition” mean?

    “Une grosse tradition” is a French expression that translates to “a big tradition” or “a longstanding tradition” in English. Here’s some information about its meaning, usage, and related details:

    Meaning: “Une grosse tradition” refers to a tradition that is well-established, significant, and often celebrated on a large scale. It implies that the tradition has been passed down through generations and has gained importance and recognition over time.

    Usage: The expression is commonly used to emphasize the size, importance, and longevity of a tradition. It can be used in various contexts, such as cultural traditions, festive celebrations, annual events, or customs deeply rooted in a community or society.

    Examples:

    1. “Le carnaval de cette ville est une grosse tradition qui attire des milliers de visiteurs chaque année.” (The carnival in this city is a big tradition that attracts thousands of visitors every year.)
    2. “Chez nous, faire une grande fête pour le Nouvel An est une grosse tradition familiale.” (In our family, having a big celebration for New Year’s is a longstanding tradition.)
    3. “La célébration de Noël avec un grand repas en famille est une grosse tradition dans notre pays.” (The celebration of Christmas with a big family meal is a major tradition in our country.)

    Notes:

    • “Une grosse tradition” implies that the tradition has significance, cultural importance, or a strong sentimental value for the people involved.
    • The adjective “grosse” is used here to emphasize the magnitude or size of the tradition, rather than referring to its literal size.
    • The expression can also be used in a figurative sense to describe well-established practices or customs in other domains, such as sports, arts, or professional settings.

    Overall, “une grosse tradition” highlights the scale, importance, and enduring nature of a tradition, emphasizing its long-established presence and significance within a particular context.

    What does “en pleine croisade” mean?

    “En pleine croisade” is a French expression that translates to “in the midst of a crusade” in English. Here’s some information about its meaning, usage, and related details:

    Meaning: “En pleine croisade” refers to being fully engaged or deeply involved in a passionate pursuit or mission, often with a sense of dedication, determination, and fervor. It conveys the idea of being actively committed to a cause or endeavor, much like the historical Crusades.

    Usage: The expression is typically used figuratively to describe someone who is wholeheartedly devoted to a cause, idea, or objective and is actively working towards its accomplishment. It can be used in various contexts, such as personal goals, activism, career pursuits, or passionate endeavors.

    Examples:

    1. “Il s’est lancé en pleine croisade pour la protection de l’environnement.” (He embarked on a crusade for environmental protection.)
    2. “Elle est en pleine croisade contre les discriminations raciales.” (She is in the midst of a crusade against racial discrimination.)
    3. “Les manifestants sont en pleine croisade pour défendre leurs droits.” (The protesters are on a crusade to defend their rights.)

    Notes:

    • The expression “en pleine croisade” often implies a strong sense of determination, zeal, and active engagement.
    • It can be used metaphorically to describe any intense and committed pursuit, not necessarily related to historical Crusades.
    • The term “croisade” itself refers to the medieval military campaigns that were undertaken by Christian armies during the Middle Ages.

    Overall, “en pleine croisade” is a vivid expression used to convey the idea of being fully devoted and actively engaged in a passionate pursuit or mission, drawing inspiration from the historical concept of the Crusades.

    What does “que nenni” mean?

    “Que nenni” is a French expression that can be translated as “far from it,” “not at all,” or “certainly not” in English. Here’s some information about its usage and meaning:

    Meaning: “Que nenni” is used to strongly deny or contradict a previous statement or assumption. It expresses a clear disagreement or rejection of what has been said or implied.

    Usage: The expression is often used in a playful or lighthearted manner to add emphasis to the denial or contradiction. It can be used in various contexts, such as in conversations, debates, or even in written texts.

    Example:

    • Person A: “Tu as sûrement triché pour gagner!” (You surely cheated to win!)
    • Person B: “Que nenni! J’ai simplement travaillé dur pour réussir.” (Far from it! I simply worked hard to succeed.)

    Notes:

    • “Que nenni” is considered an old-fashioned or literary expression, and it’s not as commonly used in modern everyday speech.
    • It adds a touch of humor or theatricality to the denial, making it more expressive and emphatic.
    • The word “nenni” itself is an archaic form of “non” (no) and is not widely used on its own outside of this expression.

    Overall, “que nenni” is a playful and emphatic way to express strong denial or contradiction. It adds a touch of flair to the statement and can be used to add a humorous or theatrical element to conversations or debates.

    What does “ben nous” mean?

    The phrase “Ben nous” is a colloquial expression in French that combines the interjection “ben” (which is a casual variant of “bien,” meaning “well” or “so”) with the pronoun “nous” (meaning “we” or “us”). Here’s some information about its usage:

    Meaning: “Ben nous” is an informal way of expressing agreement, confirmation, or acceptance. It can be translated as “Well, we” or “So, we” in English.

    Usage: It is often used in informal conversations among friends or in casual settings. The phrase is typically used to add emphasis or agreement to a statement or to indicate that the speaker shares a similar experience or perspective.

    Example:

    • Person A: “On devrait aller voir ce film ce soir.” (We should go see this movie tonight.)
    • Person B: “Ben nous, ça me dit bien !” (Well, we, I’m up for it!)

    Notes:

    • The use of “ben” instead of “bien” adds a casual and familiar tone to the expression.
    • “Ben nous” is often followed by a statement or action that supports or relates to the speaker’s agreement or acceptance.

    It’s important to note that “ben nous” is an informal expression and may not be appropriate in formal or professional contexts. It is commonly used in spoken French among friends or acquaintances.

    What does “va apprendre aux” mean?

    “Va apprendre aux” is a phrase in French that translates to “go teach” or “go educate” in English. Here’s some information about its usage and meaning:

    Meaning: “Va apprendre aux” is an imperative construction that instructs or challenges someone to teach or educate others. It implies a sense of disbelief or skepticism, suggesting that the person being addressed should not be in a position to teach or lecture others on a particular topic.

    Usage: The phrase is often used to dismiss someone’s claims or opinions by implying that they lack the necessary knowledge, experience, or authority to educate others on a specific subject. It can be employed in various contexts, such as during debates, discussions, or disagreements.

    Example:

    • “Tu ne connais même pas les bases, alors va apprendre aux autres comment faire!” (You don’t even know the basics, so go teach others how to do it!)

    Notes:

    • The phrase is usually used in a confrontational or sarcastic manner to challenge someone’s credibility or knowledge.
    • It can be employed in both formal and informal settings, depending on the context and relationship between the individuals involved.
    • The verb “apprendre” (to teach) in this phrase is used in its imperative form, addressing someone directly and instructing them to go and fulfill the action.

    Overall, “va apprendre aux” is a phrase used to express doubt or disbelief in someone’s ability to educate others on a particular topic. It is often employed as a dismissive or challenging remark in conversations or debates.

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    This is French in real life. Hear “sauf”, “en pleine croisade”, “que nenni”, and “ben nous” in one clip just 15 seconds long. Can you hear and understand them all? Start at any level and improve your listening skills. Listen with us whether you’re prepping for the DALF or just starting at A1.

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