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Manger ep. 1, Quiz 54: ne nous voilons pas la face

    What does “ne nous voilons pas la face” mean? Hear it in this 21 second clip from the Manger podcast and fill in the blanks of our transcription quiz. Improve your French listening skills with French in real life, Start at any level A1 thru C2

    This clip is from Manger Episode 1. Listen and fill in what you hear below. Read more and find a translation below. Listen to the full episode here.

    21 seconds, 78 words

    This audio sample and transcription is from Manger ep. 1. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode

    ,,,,,.,,,. '.
    ,encoreparlercontrôlecorpsinjonctionsminceur,mêmesi,voilonsface,céréalesenfaitbourréesNora,diététiques.Special,soitbonsbolscéréales,,quandmême. L'équivalentFrostiesbienpire.
    voilà,onenestencoreàparlercontrôlecorpsfemmesinjonctionsàlaminceur,mêmesi,nevoilonspasface,toutescéréalessontenfaitbourréessucreNora,doncpastrèsdiététiques.ParexemplegrammesSpecial,soitbonsbolscéréales,vadire,ilyaquandmêmegrammessucre. L'équivalentFrostiesestbienpiregrammessucre.

    Let’s face it

    Let’s face it, Rome wasn’t built in a day.

    What’s opening up for you in this clip?

    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    Et voilà, on en est encore à parler du contrôle du corps des femmes et injonctions à la minceur, même si, ne nous voilons pas la face, toutes les céréales sont en fait bourrées de sucre Nora, donc pas très diététiques. Par exemple pour 100 g de Special K, soit deux bons bols de céréales, on va dire, il y a quand même 12 g de sucre. L’équivalent en Frosties est bien pire avec 35 grammes de sucre.

    And here we are, still talking about the control of women’s bodies and the injunctions to be thin, even if, let’s face it, all cereals are in fact full of sugar Nora, so not very healthy. For example, for 100 g of Special K, that is to say two good bowls of cereal, there are still 12 g of sugar. The equivalent in Frosties is much worse with 35 grams of sugar.

    The above translation from Deepl. Source

    What does “injonctions” mean?

    The word “injonctions” in French is a plural noun derived from the verb “injoncter,” which means “to enjoin” or “to order.” It represents commands, orders, or instructions given by authority figures or society as a whole. These injunctions impose specific behaviors, beliefs, or standards on individuals or groups.

    Here are some examples:

    “The media reinforces injunctions to be thin.” (Les médias renforcent les injonctions à la minceur.)

    “Social injunctions can oppress certain individuals.” (Les injonctions sociales peuvent être oppressantes pour certaines personnes.)

    “Parental injunctions can influence children’s behavior.” (Les injonctions parentales peuvent influencer le comportement des enfants.)

    The term “injonctions” is commonly used when discussing societal expectations, cultural norms, gender roles, body image, and social pressure. In the phrase “injonctions à la minceur,” it specifically refers to the societal pressures or expectations related to thinness or having a slim body.

    The concept of “injonctions” often relates to conformity, societal norms, and the influence of media, advertising, or social institutions on individuals’ behaviors and self-perception.

    It’s important to note that while “injonctions” generally implies external pressures or expectations, it does not necessarily indicate universal or objective standards. Societal injunctions can vary across different cultures, communities, and time periods.

    Overall, “injonctions” signifies the commands or orders that impose specific behaviors, beliefs, or standards on individuals or groups. In the context of “injonctions à la minceur,” it refers to the societal pressures or expectations regarding thinness.

    What does “la minceur” mean?

    “La minceur” is a noun phrase in French that translates to “slenderness” or “thinness” in English. “La minceur” represents the physical characteristic of being thin or having a slim body shape.

    Some examples:

    • “La société valorise souvent la minceur comme idéal de beauté.” (Society often values slenderness as a beauty ideal.)
    • “Elle a réussi à atteindre la minceur qu’elle souhaitait grâce à un régime équilibré.” (She managed to achieve the thinness she desired through a balanced diet.)
    • “Certains individus ont des prédispositions génétiques à la minceur.” (Some individuals have genetic predispositions to thinness.)

    “La minceur” is commonly used in discussions about body image, beauty standards, health, and weight management. It can be a topic of focus in fashion, media, and advertising industries.

    “La minceur” is often associated with societal expectations, beauty norms, and the influence of media on body ideals. It is worth noting that societal perceptions of attractiveness and body image can vary across cultures and change over time.

    In the phrase “injonctions à la minceur,” “la minceur” represents the desired state or societal expectation of being slim. The phrase refers to the injunctions or societal pressures related to achieving or maintaining a thin body shape.

    Overall, “la minceur” describes the physical attribute of being slim or having a slender physique, and it plays a role in discussions about body image and societal beauty standards.

    What does “même si” mean?

    The expression “même si” is a commonly used phrase in French that can be translated to English as “even if” or “though.” It is a conjunction that is used to introduce a hypothetical or contrary condition that may or may not be true. It implies that despite the condition mentioned, the main clause or action still holds or is valid.

    Some examples:

    • “Même si je suis fatigué, je vais continuer à travailler.” (Even if I am tired, I will continue working.)
    • “Même si tu ne m’aimes pas, je serai toujours là pour toi.” (Though you don’t love me, I will always be there for you.)
    • “Même si elle étudie beaucoup, elle a du mal à réussir ses examens.” (Even though she studies a lot, she struggles to pass her exams.)

    The phrase “même si” is used in various contexts and can be employed in both formal and informal speech. It allows for the expression of a hypothetical or contrasting condition, highlighting a potential obstacle or contradiction.

    The opposite of “même si” is “même pas,” which means “not even” or “not even if.” It is used to express a stronger negation or denial of a condition or possibility.

    It’s important to note that “même si” can also be used to express a concession or contrast in addition to introducing a condition. In such cases, it indicates that the following information contradicts or goes against what might be expected.

    Overall, “même si” is a versatile conjunction that introduces a hypothetical or contrary condition while emphasizing the continuation or validity of the main clause. It allows for the expression of contrasting ideas or concessions in a sentence.

    What does “ne nous voilons pas la face” mean?

    The expression “ne nous voilons pas la face” is a French phrase that translates as “let’s not kid ourselves” or “let’s not deceive ourselves.” It is an idiomatic expression, use it when you want to encourage facing or acknowledging a difficult truth or reality. It’s a figurative expression that urges honesty and confronting the truth. It suggests avoiding self-deception or denying an evident fact or situation.

    Some examples:

    • “Les problèmes économiques sont réels, ne nous voilons pas la face.” (The economic problems are real, let’s not kid ourselves.)
    • “Ne nous voilons pas la face, notre équipe a besoin de s’améliorer pour gagner.” (Let’s not deceive ourselves, our team needs to improve to win.)
    • “Il est temps de reconnaître nos erreurs, ne nous voilons pas la face.” (It’s time to acknowledge our mistakes, let’s not kid ourselves.)

    “Ne nous voilons pas la face” is used in various contexts, including personal relationships, professional settings, and societal issues. It encourages honesty, self-reflection, and facing uncomfortable truths.

    In English, similar expressions that convey a similar sentiment include “let’s not pretend,” “let’s not fool ourselves,” or “let’s not bury our heads in the sand.”

    The expression serves as a reminder to confront reality, acknowledge the challenges or issues at hand, and take appropriate actions instead of denying or avoiding them.

    Overall, “ne nous voilons pas la face” is an idiomatic phrase that encourages honesty and facing the truth without self-deception. It emphasizes the importance of acknowledging reality and dealing with it in a straightforward manner.

    What does “bourrées” mean?

    In the context of the phrase “toutes les céréales sont en fait bourrées de sucre,” the term “bourrées” is used metaphorically to mean “packed” or “loaded” with sugar. In this context, “bourrées” is an adjective derived from the verb “bourrer,” which means “to stuff” or “to pack.” Here, it conveys the idea that cereals have a high concentration of sugar.

    Example phrase: “Toutes les céréales sont en fait bourrées de sucre” translates to “All cereals are actually loaded with sugar.”

    This usage of “bourrées” is colloquial and informal. It emphasizes the notion that cereals, often considered a healthy or nutritious breakfast option, actually contain a significant amount of added sugars.

    Overall, in the phrase “toutes les céréales sont en fait bourrées de sucre,” “bourrées” metaphorically conveys the idea that cereals are packed or loaded with sugar. It highlights the perception that many cereals contain a significant amount of added sugars, which should be considered when making dietary choices.

    What does “on va dire” mean?

    The phrase “on va dire” is a commonly used expression in French that can be translated to English as “let’s say” or “we’ll say.” It is an informal way to introduce an approximation or an estimation, allowing for a degree of flexibility or subjective interpretation. It implies that the following information is an approximation or an estimation, often used to simplify a complex concept or make a generalization.

    Some examples:

    “La réunion a duré, on va dire, deux heures.” (The meeting lasted, let’s say, two hours.)

    “Il était, on va dire, très en colère.” (He was, let’s say, very angry.)

    “Il y avait, on va dire, une centaine de personnes présentes.” (There were, let’s say, around a hundred people in attendance.)

    “On va dire” is commonly used in casual conversations, discussions, and informal contexts. It allows for a certain level of approximation or flexibility in conveying information, especially when specific details are not readily available or when there is room for interpretation.

    In English, similar expressions include “let’s say,” “we can say,” “approximately,” or “roughly.”

    It’s important to note that “on va dire” is not used in formal or precise contexts where accuracy and specificity are required. It is more commonly used in everyday conversations to convey an idea or provide an estimated value without being overly precise.

    Overall, “on va dire” is an informal expression that introduces an approximation or estimation. It allows for flexibility and simplification in conveying information, particularly in casual conversations or when specific details are not available.

    What does “bien pire” mean?

    The phrase “bien pire” in French translates to “much worse” or “far worse” in English. It is a comparative expression used to emphasize that a situation or condition is significantly more negative or severe than another. “Bien pire” combines the adverb “bien” (meaning “well” or “much”) and the adjective “pire” (meaning “worse”). Together, they convey the idea of a considerable or substantial worsening of a situation.

    Some examples:

    • “La situation est déjà mauvaise, mais cela pourrait être bien pire.” (The situation is already bad, but it could be much worse.)
    • “Les conséquences de cette décision sont bien pires que prévu.” (The consequences of this decision are much worse than expected.)
    • “La deuxième guerre mondiale a été bien pire que la première.” (World War II was far worse than the first one.)

    “Bien pire” is commonly used to compare the severity or negativity of two situations, emphasizing that one is significantly more detrimental or unfavorable than the other.

    The opposite of “bien pire” is “bien meilleur” or “bien mieux,” which mean “much better” or “far better.”

    It’s worth noting that “bien pire” is an idiomatic expression used for emphasis, and the degree of “worseness” it implies depends on the context and the specific situations being compared.

    Overall, “bien pire” is a comparative expression that emphasizes a significant worsening or deterioration in a situation or condition. It is used to highlight the severity or negativity of a particular scenario in relation to another.

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    What does “ne nous voilons pas la face” mean? Hear it in this 21 second clip from the Manger podcast and fill in the blanks of our transcription quiz. Improve your French listening skills with French in real life, Start at any level A1 thru C2

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