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Manger ep. 1, Quiz 76: il faut pas

    “ces personnes-là” & “il faut pas” what do these phrases mean? Hear them in this clip of French in real life. Start at any level with our transcription quiz, fill in the blanks to practice and improve your French listening skills!

    This clip is from Manger Episode 1. Listen and fill in what you hear below. Read more and find a translation below. Listen to the full episode here.

    10 seconds, 33 words

    This audio sample and transcription is from Manger ep. 1. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode

    , -, ', '. ' ' ' '.
    Donc, -,rendentcompte qu'ellesrepas, qu'ellesforcent.faut qu'elles s'écoutent qu'elles n'écoutentinjonctions.
    Donc,ces personnes-là,siserendentcompte qu'ellessontrepas,fautpas qu'ellesforcent.faut qu'elles s'écoutent qu'elles n'écoutenttoutesinjonctions.

    shouldn’t

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    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    Donc, ces personnes-là, si elles se rendent compte qu’elles sont très bien avec deux repas, il faut pas qu’elles se forcent. Il faut qu’elles s’écoutent elles et qu’elles n’écoutent pas toutes les injonctions.

    So if these people realize that they’re fine with two meals, they shouldn’t force themselves. They need to listen to themselves and not listen to all the injunctions.

    The above translation from Deepl. Source

    What does “ces personnes-là” mean?

    The construction “ces personnes-là” in French combines the demonstrative determiner “ces” (these) with the noun “personnes” (people) and the adverbial particle “là” (there). “Ces personnes-là” can be translated as “those people” or “these individuals” in English. It specifically refers to a particular group of people or individuals that are being identified or pointed out.

    The particle “là” is used to reinforce or specify the location or identity of the referent. It emphasizes the distinction between the group of people being referred to and other possible groups or individuals.

    The construction “ces personnes-là” adds emphasis and specificity to the reference, indicating that the speaker is referring to a specific set of people within a larger group or context.

    Examples:

    • “Ces personnes-là ont remporté le concours de danse.” (Those people won the dance competition.)
    • “J’aime bien discuter avec ces étudiants-là.” (I enjoy talking with these students.)

    This construction is part of a broader pattern in French where the demonstrative determiner “ce” is combined with nouns and the adverbial particle “là” to provide additional emphasis or distinction. Examples include “ce livre-là” (that book), “cette maison-là” (that house), or “ces choses-là” (those things).

    What does “il faut pas” mean?

    The phrase “il faut pas” is a colloquial and informal contraction in spoken French. It combines the subject pronoun “il” (it) and the verb “faut” (from the verb “falloir,” meaning “to be necessary”) with the negation particle “pas.”

    “Il faut pas” can be translated as “don’t have to” or “shouldn’t” in English. It expresses a negated form of obligation, indicating that something is not necessary or not required.

    This contraction is commonly used in spoken French, particularly in informal contexts and everyday conversations. It is often heard in casual speech and may not adhere to strict grammatical rules.

    Examples:

    • “Il faut pas oublier de fermer la porte en partant.” (Don’t forget to close the door when you leave.)
    • “Il faut pas trop s’inquiéter, ça va aller.” (You shouldn’t worry too much, it will be fine.)

    It’s important to note that while “il faut pas” is widely used in spoken language, it may not be considered appropriate in formal or written contexts. In more formal settings, it is recommended to use the full form “il ne faut pas” to express negation.

    This contraction is similar to other informal contractions in French, such as “j’ai pas” (I don’t have), “tu peux pas” (you can’t), or “on va pas” (we’re not going to). These contractions are characteristic of colloquial speech and are generally avoided in formal writing.

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    “ces personnes-là” & “il faut pas” what do these phrases mean? Hear them in this clip of French in real life. Start at any level with our transcription quiz, fill in the blanks to practice and improve your French listening skills!

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