Skip to content

Manger ep. 1, Quiz 90: passer à la caisse

    What can “passer à la caisse” mean? There might be a couple meanings… What do you hear in this clip of French in the wild? Start at any level, choose how much of the transcript you see and fill in the blanks!

    This clip is from Manger Episode 1. Listen and fill in what you hear below. Read more and find a translation below. Listen to the full episode here.

    8 seconds, 30 words

    This audio sample and transcription is from Manger ep. 1. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode

    ' -. ' ',.
    ' mini-révolution. J'étaisfièrepassercaissedéfaire j'avais,.
    C'est mini-révolution. J'étaistropfièrepasseràcaissedéfaireque j'avaisfaittouteenfance,savoirmangersucré.

    to take the plunge

    Do you think she means “take the plunge” or do you think she means literally go to the cash register? She is at Monoprix, after all…. It seems both could work.

    Also, I wonder if the “savoir” in this phrase is an intentional use, implying conscious awareness or understanding of how to consume such foods. This would suggest a certain level of control or intention in their eating habits. What do you think?

    What’s opening up for you in this clip?

    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    C’est un peu une mini-révolution pour moi. J’étais trop fière de passer à la caisse et de me défaire de ce que j’avais fait toute mon enfance, savoir manger sucré.

    It was a bit of a mini-revolution for me. I was too proud to take the plunge and do away with what I’d done all my childhood, which was to eat sweets.

    The above translation from Deepl. Source

    What does “trop fière” mean?

    The phrase “trop fière” in French translates to “too proud” or “very proud” in English. “Trop” means “too” or “very” in French, and “fière” is the feminine form of the adjective “fier” which means “proud.”

    Examples:

    • “Je suis trop fière de ma fille pour avoir obtenu son diplôme avec distinction.” (I am so proud of my daughter for graduating with honors.)
    • “Il était trop fier de lui après avoir remporté la compétition.” (He was very proud of himself after winning the competition.)
    • “Elle est trop fière de son nouvel emploi dans une grande entreprise.” (She is too proud of her new job in a big company.)

    What does “passer à la caisse” mean?

    The phrase “passer à la caisse” is an idiomatic expression in French. It’s interesting to see Deepl’s translation as “take the plunge”! Do you think she means that or do you think she means literally go to the cash register? She is at Monoprix, after all…

    Literal Meaning: “Passer à la caisse” literally translates to “to go to the cash register” or “to go through the checkout.” It refers to the action of moving to the cash register area in a store or supermarket to pay for your purchases.

    Figurative Meaning: Figuratively, “passer à la caisse” is used to convey the idea of paying or settling a bill, both in a literal and metaphorical sense. It can imply the need to pay a financial obligation, face the consequences of one’s actions, or accept the outcomes or responsibilities of a situation.

    Example:

    • “Je vais passer à la caisse pour régler mes achats” (I’m going to the checkout to pay for my purchases)
    • “Il va devoir passer à la caisse pour ses erreurs” (He will have to face the consequences for his mistakes).

    In a broader sense, “passer à la caisse” can also refer to the idea of “paying the price” for something, whether it be in terms of effort, sacrifice, or facing the repercussions of a decision. Idiomatic

    The phrase is commonly used in everyday conversation and can be applied in various contexts, such as in retail settings, financial discussions, or even when talking about facing consequences or taking responsibility.

    What does “me défaire” mean?

    I love deepl’s translation of this phrase above “to take the plunge”.

    The reflexive pronoun “me” indicates that the action of “défaire” is being performed on oneself. The verb “défaire” means “to undo,” “to untie,” or “to dismantle.” “Me défaire” can be translated as “to undo myself” or “to free myself.”

    It suggests the act of getting rid of or breaking free from something, either physically or metaphorically.

    Example:

    • “Je me suis défaite de mes mauvaises habitudes” (I got rid of my bad habits)
    • “Il faut que je me défasse de cette idée” (I need to let go of this idea).

    What did you love about this?

    Comment below with your feedback! Tells us what you think. Send a note or leave a comment below. We appreciate the feedback. Also, we’re always looking for partners to build this site and grow the content available.

    What can “passer à la caisse” mean? There might be a couple meanings… What do you hear in this clip of French in the wild? Start at any level, choose how much of the transcript you see and fill in the blanks!

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *