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Passerelles ep. 1, Quiz 53: à ce sujet

    Improve your ear for French with the transition phrase “à ce sujet” and a taste of the passive voice. How much can you hear in this clip from Passerelles? It’s moderately paced. Fill in the blanks while you listen!

    This clip is from Passerelles Episode 1. Listen and fill in what you hear below. Read more and find a translation below. Listen to the full episode here.

    10 seconds, 23 words

    This audio sample and transcription is from Passerelles ep. 1. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode

    , ' '.
    ,étudesmenéesdifférencesquiexister 'apparent 'individuchronologique.
    Àsujet,étudesontétémenéesdifférencesquipeuventexisterentre l'âgeapparent 'individuâgechronologique.

    On this subject

    What’s opening up for you with this clip?

    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    À ce sujet, des études ont été menées sur les différences qui peuvent exister entre l’âge apparent d’un individu et son âge chronologique.

    On this subject, studies have been carried out on the differences that can exist between an individual’s apparent age and his or her chronological age.

    The above translation from Deepl. Source

    What does “à ce sujet” mean?

    “À ce sujet” translates directly to “on this subject” or “about this” in English. It’s used to refer or return to a particular topic of discussion.

    When conversations drift, or if someone wants to ensure the focus remains on a specific point, “à ce sujet” can be used. Example: “À ce sujet, j’ai entendu dire que la conférence avait été reportée.” (On that subject, I heard that the conference was postponed.)

    The phrase is also a useful transition when someone wants to introduce a thought or opinion about a particular subject. Example: “Il a mentionné le nouveau projet. À ce sujet, je pense que nous devrions revoir notre stratégie.” (He mentioned the new project. About that, I think we should review our strategy.)

    And when inquiring about a particular matter or topic. Example: “As-tu des informations à ce sujet ?” (Do you have any information on this subject?)

    Similar Phrases:

    • À propos de: Means “about” or “concerning.” It’s similar in usage to “à ce sujet.” Example: “À propos de cette affaire, avez-vous de nouvelles informations?” (Concerning this matter, do you have any new information?)
    • Sur ce point: Refers to a specific point or detail rather than a broader subject. Example: “Sur ce point, je suis d’accord avec toi.” (On that point, I agree with you.)
    • Concernant: Another way to say “concerning” or “regarding.” Example: “Concernant ce problème, nous cherchons une solution.” (Regarding this issue, we’re looking for a solution.)

    While “à ce sujet” is neutral and can be used in both formal and informal contexts, it’s always a good idea to be aware of the tone and nature of the conversation to choose the most fitting phrase. Like its English counterpart “on this subject,” it’s a versatile tool for smoothly guiding or refocusing discussions.

    What does “ont été menées” mean?

    The choice between “ont été menées” and “ont menées” involves understanding the difference between the active and passive voices in French, just as in English.

    1. Active Voice: The subject performs the action.
      • Example: “Les chercheurs ont mené l’étude.” (The researchers conducted the study.)
        • Here, “Les chercheurs” (the researchers) is the subject, and they are the ones doing the action of conducting the study.
    2. Passive Voice: The subject receives the action. The action is being done to the subject by an agent.
      • Example: “L’étude a été menée par les chercheurs.” (The study was conducted by the researchers.)
        • Here, “L’étude” (the study) is the subject, and it is receiving the action. The action is being done to the study by the researchers.

    “Ont menées”: This is the third person plural form of the verb “mener” in the compound past tense (known as the “passé composé”) in active voice. You would need a direct object following it that agrees in gender and number. For example: “Ils ont mené les études” (They conducted the studies) or “Elles ont menées les recherches” (They conducted the researches, with “elles” referring to a feminine subject).

    “Ont été menées”: This is the third person plural form of the verb “mener” in the compound past tense, but in passive voice. It means the action was done to the subject by someone else. For instance, “Les études ont été menées par des experts” (The studies were conducted by experts).

    So, the main difference lies in whether the subject of the sentence is doing the action (active voice) or the action is being done to the subject (passive voice). The choice between these two forms depends on how you want to frame the information or what you want to emphasize in your sentence.

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    Improve your ear for French with the transition phrase “à ce sujet” and a taste of the passive voice. How much can you hear in this clip from Passerelles? It’s moderately paced. Fill in the blanks while you listen!

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