Skip to content

Passerelles ep. 1, Quiz 63: paraître

    What do the phrases: “d’une part”, “se rajeunir”, “c’est-à-dire”, “paraître”, “vieillir jeune”, & “entre guillemets” mean? Hear them all in today’s clip. Wow. That is a lot. This clip is slower paced, try to catch all 27 words in it.

    This clip is from Passerelles Episode 1. Listen and fill in what you hear below. Read more and find a translation below. Listen to the full episode here.

    20 seconds, 38 words

    This audio sample and transcription is from Passerelles ep. 1. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode

    ',, '--, « » , '.
    ',tendancerajeunir, '--tendanceessayerparaître,encouragée « vieillirjeune » guillemets,délaissedétourne 'vieillesse.
    'part,tendanceàserajeunir, c'est-à-diretendanceàessayerparaîtrejeune,estencouragéeculture « vieillirjeune » guillemets,culturequidélaissequisedétourne l'extrêmevieillesse.

    to seem

    What’s opening up for you with this clip?

    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    D’une part, la tendance à se rajeunir, c’est-à-dire la tendance à essayer de paraître plus jeune, elle est encouragée par notre culture du « vieillir jeune » entre guillemets, une culture qui délaisse et qui se détourne de l’extrême vieillesse.

    On the one hand, the tendency to look younger, i.e. the tendency to try to look younger, is encouraged by our culture of “aging young” in quotation marks, a culture that neglects and turns away from extreme old age.

    The above translation from Deepl. Source

    What does “d’une part” mean?

    The phrase “d’une part” is a French expression often used to introduce one aspect or part of a more complex idea or argument. It’s usually followed by “d’autre part” to present a contrasting or complementary point. The expression is similar to saying “on one hand” in English, which is typically followed by “on the other hand.”

    Examples:

    • “D’une part, il est très intelligent, mais d’autre part, il est assez paresseux.” (On one hand, he is very intelligent, but on the other hand, he is quite lazy.)
    • “D’une part, la technologie facilite notre vie quotidienne; d’autre part, elle peut aussi nous rendre paresseux.” (On one hand, technology makes our daily lives easier; on the other hand, it can also make us lazy.)

    When to Use:

    This expression is often used in both spoken and written French to create a balanced argument or to show multiple facets of a situation. It is especially helpful when you want to present two sides of a story or demonstrate the complexity of an issue.

    Related Phrases:

    • “En revanche” (On the other hand, in contrast)
    • “Par contre” (However, on the other hand)

    Fun Facts:

    “D’une part” is also occasionally used by itself to introduce a single point without necessarily having to be followed by “d’autre part.” In this case, it serves to emphasize that the point being made is just one aspect of the topic at hand.

    In Summary:

    “D’une part” is a useful phrase for structuring arguments or discussions in French, often used in tandem with “d’autre part.” It’s a way to present multiple perspectives or aspects of an issue, highlighting the complexity and nuance that can exist in various situations. Whether you’re engaging in a debate, writing an essay, or simply discussing the pros and cons of a particular subject, “d’une part” is a valuable expression to know.

    What does “se rajeunir” mean?

    “Se rajeunir” translates to “to rejuvenate oneself” or “to make oneself look younger” in English. The phrase refers to actions or procedures that aim to make one appear or feel younger than one’s actual age. This could involve anything from skincare treatments and cosmetic surgery to adopting a youthful attitude or lifestyle.

    Examples:

    • “Elle a décidé de se rajeunir avec un nouveau look.” (She decided to make herself look younger with a new look.)
    • “Beaucoup de gens cherchent à se rajeunir à travers l’exercice et une alimentation saine.” (Many people try to rejuvenate themselves through exercise and a healthy diet.)

    Related Phrases:

    • “Rajeunissement facial” (Facial rejuvenation)
    • “Rester jeune” (To stay young)

    An antonym to “se rajeunir” might be “vieillir naturellement,” meaning “to age naturally.” You wouldn’t use “se rajeunir” if you’re discussing embracing the natural aging process without attempting to reverse or slow it down.

    Cultural Notes: In French culture, as in many others, there’s a significant emphasis on youthfulness and beauty. Consequently, the concept of “se rajeunir” is commonly discussed, especially in the realms of fashion, health, and beauty.

    Fun Facts:

    While “se rajeunir” usually pertains to physical appearance, it can also refer to rejuvenating one’s mindset or spirit, embodying a more youthful approach to life.

    So, the next time you’re discussing aging, beauty treatments, or lifestyle changes in French, “se rajeunir” might be a phrase that captures the essence of wanting to look or feel younger.

    What does “c’est-à-dire” mean?

    The phrase “c’est-à-dire” is a common French expression that translates to “that is to say,” “meaning,” or “i.e.” in English. It’s often used to clarify a statement, offer a more specific explanation, or provide additional context to what has just been said. Essentially, “c’est-à-dire” is a tool for elaboration or clarification.

    Examples:

    • “J’adore les sports nautiques, c’est-à-dire la voile, le surf et la natation.” (I love water sports, that is to say, sailing, surfing, and swimming.)
    • “Il travaille dans le secteur public, c’est-à-dire pour le gouvernement.” (He works in the public sector, meaning he works for the government.)

    When to Use:

    You can use “c’est-à-dire” whenever you feel the need to clarify or expand upon a statement or concept, either for your benefit or the listener’s. It signals to the listener that additional, clarifying information is about to be provided.

    Related Phrases:

    • “En d’autres termes” (In other words)
    • “Pour être plus précis” (To be more precise)

    Fun Facts:

    The expression is often abbreviated to “c-à-d” in written text, especially in informal contexts like texting or note-taking.

    In Summary:

    “C’est-à-dire” is a key French phrase for clarification, ensuring clear and mutual understanding in both written and spoken contexts.

    What does “paraître” mean?

    The verb “paraître” translates to “to appear” or “to seem” in English. It’s often used to describe how something looks or seems to someone, whether it’s a person, a situation, or an object.

    Examples:

    • “Elle paraît heureuse.” (She seems happy.)
    • “Le projet paraît compliqué à première vue.” (The project seems complicated at first glance.)

    Related Phrases:

    • “Paraître bien/mal” (To look good/bad)
    • “Il me paraît que…” (It seems to me that…)

    Antonyms:
    An antonym for “paraître” might be “disparaître,” meaning “to disappear.” You wouldn’t use “paraître” if you’re discussing something that is not visible or noticeable. If you’re talking about something that’s certain or definite, you might opt for a verb like “être” (to be) instead of “paraître,” which often implies some level of uncertainty or subjectivity.

    Fun Facts:

    “Paraître” can also be used in legal contexts, where it translates to “to be published” or “to appear in court.”

    Whether you’re describing first impressions, making observations, or discussing how things seem to be, “paraître” is a versatile verb that comes in handy in various contexts.

    What does “vieillir jeune” mean?

    The phrase “vieillir jeune” translates to “age young” or “age gracefully” in English. It encapsulates the idea of growing older while maintaining one’s youthful spirit, vitality, and perhaps even appearance. It promotes the concept that age is not just a number but also a state of mind, and that one can embrace the aging process in a positive and healthy manner.

    Examples:

    • “Elle a 60 ans, mais elle sait vraiment comment vieillir jeune.” (She’s 60, but she really knows how to age gracefully.)
    • “Il n’est jamais trop tôt pour commencer à vieillir jeune en prenant soin de soi.” (It’s never too early to start aging gracefully by taking care of oneself.)

    When to Use:

    The phrase is generally used in a positive or aspirational context, often when discussing lifestyles, habits, or attitudes that contribute to a healthier and more fulfilling experience of aging. You might encounter it in discussions about wellness, exercise, mental health, or philosophy of life.

    Related Phrases:

    • “Bien vieillir” (to age well)
    • “Jeunesse éternelle” (eternal youth)

    Cultural Notes:

    The phrase reflects broader cultural discussions about aging, particularly in Western societies where youthfulness is often idealized. It speaks to the desire to not only live a long life but to do so with quality and a sense of youthfulness that defies age.

    In Summary:

    “Vieillir jeune” is a French phrase that denotes aging aging with grace, vitality, and a youthful spirit; it offers a positive perspective on growing older in various contexts.

    What does “entre guillemets” mean?

    The French phrase “entre guillemets” literally translates to “between quotation marks” in English. It refers to a word, phrase, or sentence that is being cited directly or emphasized for a particular reason, similar to how quotation marks are used in English. The phrase is often employed to indicate irony, sarcasm, or to cite someone else’s words directly.

    Examples:

    • “Il a dit qu’il était ‘entre guillemets’ malade, mais il semblait très bien à moi.” (He said he was “sick,” but he seemed fine to me.)
    • “La raison ‘entre guillemets’ de son départ reste inconnue.” (The “reason” for his departure remains unknown.)

    When to Use:

    You would use “entre guillemets” when you want to emphasize or call attention to a particular word or phrase, often to question its validity or to indicate that it’s a quote from someone else. It serves a similar function to air quotes in English, though it may sound more formal.

    Other Phrases:

    You might also hear similar expressions that convey the same idea:

    • “Pour ainsi dire” (so to speak)
    • “En quelque sorte” (in a way)

    Cultural Notes:

    In written French, guillemets are actually the angled quotation marks « » commonly used to quote direct speech or text. The term has carried over into spoken language to describe the act of “quoting” even if no actual quotation marks are being used.

    In Summary:

    “Entre guillemets” is used in French to quote or emphasize words, helping you catch subtle nuances in both spoken and written contexts.

    What did you love about this?

    Comment below with your feedback! Tells us what you think. Send a note or leave a comment below. We appreciate the feedback. Also, we’re always looking for partners to build this site and grow the content available.

    What do the phrases: “d’une part”, “se rajeunir”, “c’est-à-dire”, “paraître”, “vieillir jeune”, & “entre guillemets” mean? Hear them all in today’s clip. Wow. That is a lot. This clip is slower paced, try to catch all 27 words in it.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *