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Transfert s01e22, Quiz 50: ont bossé

    Improve your French listening skills with today’s clip of French in real life. This longer clip is from Transfert. Can you pick up all the words in this clip? I found “connu la guerre”, “ont bossé”, and “pour eux” all interesting. Set your level and fill in the blanks as you listen!

    Learn French with a podcast snippet! This clip is is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    14 seconds, 44 words
    ,, ',.. ',,,,dépe.. ' '.
    connuguerre,bossé,gagnaient d'argent,quittéBretagnebosser.Euh.eux ',,,,dépe.euh. n'étaient n'étaientglamoureux.
    ontconnuguerre,ontbossé,gagnaient d'argent,ontquittéBretagnevenirbosserà.Euh.eux c'étaitleurvie,travail,travail,travail,dépedépenser.euh.Donc n'étaient n'étaientglamoureux.

    The above audio sample and transcription is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    they worked

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    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    Ils ont connu la guerre, ils ont bossé, ils gagnaient pas beaucoup d’argent, ils ont quitté la Bretagne pour venir bosser à Paris. Euh. Et pour eux c’était leur vie, travail, travail, travail, dépe… dépenser peu. euh. Donc ils n’étaient ils n’étaient pas glamoureux.

    They went to war, they worked, they didn’t make much money, they left Brittany to work in Paris. Uh. And for them it was their life, work, work, work, spend… spend little. uh. So they weren’t they weren’t glamorous.

    The above translation from Deepl

    What does “connu la guerre” mean?

    The phrase “connu la guerre” translates to “experienced the war” or “knew the war” in English. It is used to indicate that someone has lived through or had direct experience with a time of war.

    Usage and Context:

    • Referring to Personal Experience: “Connu la guerre” is typically used to talk about individuals who have lived during wartime, implying direct or indirect experience with the realities of war.
    • Historical and Biographical Contexts: This phrase is often found in historical accounts, biographies, or personal narratives relating to periods of conflict.

    Examples:

    • “Mes grands-parents ont connu la guerre.” (My grandparents experienced the war.)
    • “Il a connu la guerre et en parle souvent.” (He experienced the war and often talks about it.)

    Nuance:

    • Beyond Mere Knowledge: “Connu” in this context goes beyond just having knowledge about the war. It suggests firsthand or lived experience.
    • Emotional and Historical Weight: The phrase can carry significant emotional and historical weight, reflecting the impact of war on individual lives.

    Cultural Notes:

    • Memory and History: In many cultures, particularly in countries significantly affected by war, personal experiences of conflict are a profound part of collective memory and history. “Connu la guerre” touches on this deep historical and personal significance.

    Summary:

    “Connu la guerre” means “experienced the war” in French, used to describe someone who has lived through or had direct experience with wartime. The phrase implies more than just knowledge of war; it suggests firsthand experience and is often laden with emotional and historical significance. It’s a common phrase in contexts discussing personal or collective histories related to war.

    What does “ont bossé” mean?

    “Ont bossé” is the third-person plural form of the verb “bosser” in the passé composé tense, which translates to “they worked” or “have worked” in English. “Bosser” is an informal term for “to work.”

    Usage and Context:

    • Informal Speech: “Bosser” is a colloquial, informal synonym for the standard French verb “travailler” (to work). It’s commonly used in casual or conversational settings.
    • Past Action or State: As part of the passé composé tense, “ont bossé” refers to work that was completed in the past.

    Examples:

    • “Ils ont bossé toute la nuit sur le projet.” (They worked all night on the project.)
    • “Les étudiants ont bossé dur pour leurs examens.” (The students worked hard for their exams.)

    Nuance:

    • Casual Tone: Using “bosser” instead of “travailler” can give a sentence a more relaxed or casual tone.
    • Versatility: While informal, “bosser” is versatile and can be used in various contexts to talk about different types of work, from professional to academic.

    Cultural Notes:

    • Informality in French Language: The use of informal terms like “bosser” reflects the dynamic nature of spoken French, where casual expressions often replace more formal ones in everyday conversation.

    Summary:

    “Ont bossé” means “they worked” in French, using the informal verb “bosser” in the passé composé tense. This phrase is commonly used in casual speech to describe past work activities, reflecting the informal and dynamic aspects of conversational French.

    What does “pour eux” mean?

    “Pour eux” translates to “for them” in English. It is a phrase used to indicate that an action, thought, or item is intended for or directed towards a group of people or entities (referred to as “them”).

    Usage and Context:

    • Indicating Beneficiaries or Recipients: “Pour eux” is often used to specify who is intended to benefit from or receive something.
    • Wide Range of Applications: It can apply to various contexts, from doing a favor for a group of people to dedicating a work or gift to them.

    Examples:

    • “J’ai acheté des cadeaux pour eux.” (I bought gifts for them.)
    • “Cette chanson est pour eux.” (This song is for them.)
    • “Je fais tout cela pour eux.” (I do all this for them.)

    Nuance:

    • Indicative of Purpose or Intention: The phrase often conveys the purpose or intention behind an action, emphasizing the beneficiaries or the intended audience.
    • Inclusivity: “Pour eux” includes all members of the referenced group, regardless of gender or number, making it a comprehensive term.

    Cultural Notes:

    • Emphasis on Social Relationships: In French culture, as in many others, indicating who benefits from or is the focus of an action is important, reflecting the value placed on social relationships and collective involvement.

    Summary:

    “Pour eux” means “for them” in French and is used to indicate that something is intended for or directed towards a group of people or entities. The phrase is versatile, applicable in various contexts where the purpose or intention is to benefit, dedicate, or address a specific group. It underscores the significance of beneficiaries or recipients in an action or gesture.

    What is opening up for you?

    Comment below with the words you thought you heard, where you struggled, where you surprised yourself, or what you thought about this clip. Every little bit inspires other learners, thank you for being that inspiration to others on their French fluency journey!

    Improve your French listening skills with today’s clip of French in real life. This longer clip is from Transfert. Can you pick up all the words in this clip? I found “connu la guerre”, “ont bossé”, and “pour eux” all interesting. Set your level and fill in the blanks as you listen!

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