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Manger ep. 1, quiz 1: une passion dans la vie

    Start at any level and improve your ear for French with this clip from the Manger podcast. It’s 60 words in 20 seconds, how many can you hear and understand? A1 or DELF prepper, start here and choose how much of the transcript you can see.

    This clip is from Manger Episode 1. Listen and fill in what you hear below. Read more and find a translation below. Listen to the full podcast

    23 seconds, 74 words
    ,,.. ? ? - - ? ..
    Simonpassion,Mélissa,céréales.naturellementcréécompte@Passion_Céréales.Simonavonstoujoursmangercéréales ? aimaitautantregarderleurspaquetscroustillerlangue ? -céréalesdevenusincontournables - ? auxquellestenterrépondre.PlanCulinaire.
    Simonapassiondansvie,Mélissa,sontcéréales.adoncnaturellementcréécompteInstagram@Passion_Céréales.Simonavonstoujoursmangercéréales ? aimaitautantregarderleurspaquetsfairecroustillersouslangue ? Comment est-cequecéréalessontdevenusincontournablesau - ? Autantquestionsauxquellesvatenterrépondre.dansPlanCulinaire.

    A passion in life.

    This is a repost of the first post on site. I’m coming back to this episode of Manger. We’re going to try it again after coming through multiple episodes of Balades and other podcasts meant for learners. This one is definitely meant for native speakers, and that’s the goal of this site. French in real life.

    Originally posted July 15 2021

    Why start here? Well, breakfast is the first meal of the day…

    It seems that the Manger podcast from Louie Media is no longer actively producing new content. While that’s the case, the titles of their pieces caught my eye. I researched where to start with French podcasts and multiple lists for 2020 claim Manger is a must-listen French podcasts (when Googling in French). So it seems worth a listen.

    It’s not an easy podcast for a beginner though.

    The first episode is about breakfast cereal. Something we all love it seems. I know I love it, and the shared love is exactly what brought me in to start here. I too, share Simon’s passion.

    How much of this podcast are you picking up?
    Can you only hear the articles or are you catching keywords?

    There’s absolutely no way that I could get through an entire podcast in French without melting my brain, that’s why I broke it up into snippets like this. Try the next one.

    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    Simon a une passion dans la vie Mélissa, ce sont les céréales. Il a donc tout naturellement créé le compte Instagram @Passion_Céréales. Pourquoi Simon et vous et nous avons toujours manger des céréales ? Pourquoi on aimait autant regarder leurs paquets et les faire croustiller sous notre langue ? Comment est-ce que les céréales sont devenus incontournables au petit-déjeuner ? Autant de questions auxquelles on va tenter de répondre. Bienvenue dans Plan Culinaire.

    Simon has a passion in life Melissa, it’s cereal. So naturally he created the Instagram account @Passion_Céréales. Why have you and Simon and we always eaten cereal? Why did we love looking at their packages so much and making them crunch under our tongue? How did cereals become a breakfast staple? So many questions that we will try to answer. Welcome to Plan Culinaire [later Manger].

    Translated with Deepl. Source.

    What does “dans la vie” mean in French?

    “Dans la vie” is a French phrase that means “in life.” It is commonly used in French language and culture to express various ideas and concepts related to life.

    Here are some examples/uses of the phrase:

    1. “Dans la vie, il faut prendre des risques.” (In life, you have to take risks.) – This is a common motivational phrase that encourages people to step out of their comfort zone and pursue their dreams.
    2. “Dans la vie, rien n’est facile.” (In life, nothing is easy.) – This is a phrase that acknowledges the challenges and difficulties that people face in life and encourages them to stay strong and persevere.
    3. “Il faut profiter de chaque moment dans la vie.” (You have to enjoy every moment in life.) – This is a phrase that emphasizes the importance of living in the present and cherishing the small things in life.

    The French language has many idiomatic expressions that use the phrase “dans la vie,” such as “dans la vie de château” (in the life of a castle) which means living a luxurious lifestyle. Another example is “dans la vie de bohème” (in the life of a Bohemian) which refers to a carefree and artistic lifestyle.

    What does “tenter” mean in French?

    “tenter” is a French verb that can be translated into English as “to attempt,” “to try,” or “to tempt.” It is a common verb in both formal and informal French and has several uses and meanings.

    Here are some examples of how “tenter” can be used:

    1. “Je vais tenter ma chance.” (I’m going to try my luck.) – This phrase is often used when someone is about to take a risk or try something new.
    2. “Elle a tenté de résoudre le problème.” (She attempted to solve the problem.) – This use of “tenter” emphasizes the action of trying to accomplish something, without necessarily indicating whether or not the attempt was successful.
    3. “Le chocolat me tente.” (I’m tempted by chocolate.) – This use of “tenter” expresses the feeling of being drawn or attracted to something, often something that is desirable but perhaps not the best choice.
    4. “Ne me tente pas!” (Don’t tempt me!) – This use of “tenter” is often used in the negative to express a warning or a desire to resist temptation.

    Fun fact: In French, “la tentation” is the noun form of “tenter” and is often associated with the biblical story of Adam and Eve and the temptation of the forbidden fruit.

    What does “autant de” mean in French?

    “Autant de” is a French phrase that can be translated to “as many” or “as much” in English. It is used to express equality or similarity between two things, indicating that there is an equivalent amount or number of something.

    Here are some examples of how “autant de” can be used in French:

    1. “J’ai autant de livres que toi.” (I have as many books as you.) – This use of “autant de” is used to express equality in quantity.
    2. “Il y a autant de femmes que d’hommes dans cette entreprise.” (There are as many women as men in this company.) – This use of “autant de” is used to express equality in number.
    3. “Je ne peux pas manger autant de gâteau.” (I can’t eat as much cake.) – This use of “autant de” is used to express similarity in quantity, indicating that someone can’t consume the same amount of cake as someone else.

    Fun fact: “Autant” can also be used on its own to mean “as much” or “as many” in French. For example, “J’aime autant le thé que le café” means “I like tea as much as coffee.”

    What does “devenus incontournables” mean in French?

    “Devenus incontournables” is a French phrase that can be translated into English as “become essential” or “become unavoidable.” It is a phrase that is often used to describe a person, product, or company that has become so important or influential that it cannot be ignored.

    Here are some examples of how “devenus incontournables” can be used in French:

    1. “Ces artistes sont devenus incontournables dans le monde de la musique.” (These artists have become essential in the world of music.) – This use of “devenus incontournables” is used to describe the significance and impact of the artists in the music industry.
    2. “Les réseaux sociaux sont devenus incontournables pour les entreprises.” (Social media has become essential for companies.) – This use of “devenus incontournables” is used to describe the importance of social media in the business world.
    3. “Les écrans sont devenus incontournables dans notre vie quotidienne.” (Screens have become unavoidable in our daily lives.) – This use of “devenus incontournables” is used to describe the pervasive presence of screens in our modern society.

    Fun fact: “incontournable” is derived from the French verb “contourner,” which means “to bypass” or “to go around.” Therefore, “incontournable” implies that something cannot be bypassed or avoided.

    What does “sous notre langue” mean in French?

    The French phrase “sous notre langue” has two distinct meanings. Figuratively, it refers to something that is unsaid or unspoken, but understood or implied. It is associated with the concept of “non-dits” in French culture, which refers to unspoken or suppressed feelings, emotions, or opinions. Literally, “sous notre langue” can also refer to the sensation of a flavor lingering or being present even after the food has been swallowed. In this context, it is used to describe the aftertaste of food.

    Figuratively (as in the context above):

    Yes, the phrase “sous notre langue” can also be used in relation to food. In this context, it refers to the sensation of a flavor lingering or being present even after the food has been swallowed.

    For example, if someone says “le goût de l’ail reste sous notre langue,” it means “the taste of garlic remains under our tongue.” This use of “sous notre langue” is used to describe the lingering taste of garlic in one’s mouth.

    Similarly, if someone says “le goût sucré reste sous notre langue,” it means “the sweet taste remains under our tongue.” This use of “sous notre langue” is used to describe the sensation of sweetness lingering in one’s mouth after eating something sweet.

    So, “sous notre langue” can be used both figuratively and literally, and can refer to unspoken truths or the lingering taste of food.

    And literally:

    “Sous notre langue” is a French phrase that can be translated to “under our tongue” in English. It is often used figuratively to describe something that is unsaid or unspoken, but understood or implied.

    Here are some examples of how “sous notre langue” can be used in French:

    1. “C’est quelque chose que nous savons tous, mais que nous gardons sous notre langue.” (It’s something we all know, but we keep it under our tongue.) – This use of “sous notre langue” is used to describe a common understanding that is not explicitly stated.
    2. “Il y a des vérités difficiles à dire, mais qui sont toujours présentes sous notre langue.” (There are truths that are difficult to say, but are always present under our tongue.) – This use of “sous notre langue” is used to describe unspoken truths that are always on our minds.
    3. “Elle a voulu dire quelque chose, mais elle l’a gardé sous sa langue.” (She wanted to say something, but she kept it under her tongue.) – This use of “sous sa langue” is used to describe the act of not speaking one’s mind, even though there is something that needs to be said.

    Fun fact: In French culture, the phrase “sous notre langue” is often associated with the concept of “non-dits,” which refers to unspoken or suppressed feelings, emotions, or opinions.

    Why is it “Bienvenue dans”?

    In French, “Bienvenue dans” is used to say “Welcome to” when greeting someone in a place or location. The preposition “dans” is used because it indicates that the welcome is being extended to someone who is entering a physical space or location.

    For example, if someone is visiting a friend’s house, they might be greeted with “Bienvenue dans ma maison” (Welcome to my house) or if someone is arriving at a hotel, they might be greeted with “Bienvenue dans notre hôtel” (Welcome to our hotel).

    The use of “dans” indicates that the person being welcomed is entering into a physical space or location, rather than just being welcomed in a more abstract sense.

    Did I miss something?

    Did you find a mistake or something that’s just not right…

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