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Manger ep. 1, Quiz 61: faut

    How do you use the word “faut”? Hear it in this clip from French in real life. Start at any level and fill in the blanks of our transcription quiz. Improve your French listening skills with real life French.

    This clip is from Manger Episode 1. Listen and fill in what you hear below. Read more and find a translation below. Listen to the full episode here.

    6 seconds, 24 words

    This audio sample and transcription is from Manger ep. 1. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode

    ,, ', ' - ' ' ?
    ,granola, 'céréaleindustrielle, ' - qu'ilfaut d'en ?
    doncenfait,granola, c'estcéréaleindustrielle, c'estmal - qu'ilfautarrêter d'enmanger ?

    must

    What’s opening up for you in this clip?

    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    Et donc en fait, si le granola, c’est comme une céréale industrielle, si c’est aussi le mal est-ce qu’il faut arrêter d’en manger ?

    And so, if granola is like an industrial cereal, if it’s also evil, should we stop eating it?

    The above translation from Deepl. Source

    What does “faut” mean?

    In the phrase “est-ce qu’il faut arrêter d’en manger?” the word “faut” is a form of the verb “devoir,” which means “must” or “have to” in English.

    Examples:

    • “Il faut étudier pour réussir.” (One must study to succeed.)
    • “Il faut se dépêcher si nous ne voulons pas être en retard.” (We have to hurry if we don’t want to be late.)
    • “Il faut prendre soin de sa santé.” (It is necessary to take care of one’s health.)

    “Faut” is commonly used to express obligations or requirements in various contexts. It indicates that there is a necessity or duty to perform a particular action.

    Antonyms or contrasting phrases to “faut” could include “ne pas devoir” (not have to), “n’est pas nécessaire” (is not necessary), or “n’est pas obligatoire” (is not mandatory).

    “Faut” reflects the French emphasis on responsibility and fulfilling one’s obligations. It is frequently used in everyday conversations to convey a sense of duty or necessity.

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    How do you use the word “faut”? Hear it in this clip from French in real life. Start at any level and fill in the blanks of our transcription quiz. Improve your French listening skills with real life French.

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