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Manger ep. 1, Quiz 68: ça marche

    “Mais pas trop” and “ça marche aussi” do you know those phrases? Hear them in this clip of French in real life. Select how much of the transcript you can see and fill in the blanks to practice your French listening skills. We update the site with a new listening quiz daily, take today’s quiz…

    This clip is from Manger Episode 1. Listen and fill in what you hear below. Read more and find a translation below. Listen to the full episode here.

    9 seconds, 36 words

    This audio sample and transcription is from Manger ep. 1. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode

    , ', ',, ', ',.
    , l'impressioncontraire, qu'ilfaudraitsucrépastrop,salé, ', qu'ilfautavaler,.
    , l'impressionliretoutcontraire, qu'ilfaudraitmangersucrépastrop,enfaitsalé, c'estbien, qu'ilfautavalerboissonchaude,froidemarche.

    that works

    I love how common this phrase is. At least, back in the day in my French classroom. I think I heard it a lot in France, but it’s been too long…

    What’s opening up for you in this clip?

    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    Oui, on a l’impression de lire tout et son contraire, qu’il faudrait manger sucré mais pas trop, mais en fait du salé, c’est bien aussi, qu’il faut avaler une boisson chaude, mais froide ça marche aussi.

    Yes, you get the impression that you’re reading everything and its opposite, that you should eat sweet but not too sweet, but in fact salty is good too, that you should swallow a hot drink, but cold works too.

    The above translation from Deepl. Source

    What does “mais pas trop” mean?

    “Mais trop” is a colloquial French phrase that translates to “but not too much” or “but not excessively” in English. “Mais pas trop” is used to indicate moderation or a cautious approach to a certain action, behavior, or characteristic.

    This phrase is commonly used in everyday conversations to express a preference for a balanced or moderate approach. It can be employed to express personal preferences, offer advice, or set limits in various situations.

    Examples:

    • “J’aime bien le chocolat, mais pas trop.” (I like chocolate, but not too much.)
    • “Elle est sympathique, mais pas trop bavarde.” (She is friendly, but not excessively talkative.)
    • “Tu peux sortir ce soir, mais pas trop tard.” (You can go out tonight, but not too late.)

    What does “ça marche” mean?

    “Ça marche” is a colloquial French expression that has various meanings depending on the context. Here’s some information about its different uses:

    The literal translation of “Ça marche” is “It works.” It can refer to the functioning or operation of an object, a plan, or a process. For example, if someone asks if a machine is working, you can reply, “Oui, ça marche” (Yes, it works).

    “Ça marche” is often used as a response to indicate agreement or acceptance. It can be translated as “Okay,” “Sure,” or “Sounds good.” It signifies that you agree with a proposition, plan, or arrangement.

    “Ça marche” can also be used to confirm or acknowledge that something has been understood or received. It can be similar to saying “Got it” or “Understood.” For example, if someone provides instructions, you can reply with “Ça marche” to indicate that you have understood what was said.

    “Ça marche” can be used as a polite way to decline an invitation or request. It can be translated as “That works for me” or “That’s fine, but I can’t.” It acknowledges the proposal positively while expressing an inability to participate.

    “Ça marche” is a commonly used phrase in French informal conversations. It reflects a casual and friendly tone in communication, allowing for quick agreements, confirmations, or acknowledgments.

    The expression “Ça marche” is derived from the verb “marcher” (to walk or to work). The phrase uses “marche” in its third-person singular form, which is commonly used idiomatically in French.

    In summary, “Ça marche” is a versatile French expression used in different contexts. It can mean “It works,” express agreement or acceptance, confirm understanding, or serve as a polite way to decline. Understanding the various uses of “Ça marche” adds a practical and conversational aspect to your French language skills.

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    “Mais pas trop” and “ça marche aussi” do you know those phrases? Hear them in this clip of French in real life. Select how much of the transcript you can see and fill in the blanks to practice your French listening skills. We update the site with a new listening quiz daily, take today’s quiz…

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