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Inner French ep. 001, quiz 50:

    Improve your French listening skills with this clip. Start at any level! It’s 72 words in 33 seconds, how many can you hear? Choose how much of the transcript you can see and follow along.

    This clip is from the Inner French podcast Episode 001. Listen and fill in what you hear below. Read more and find a translation below. Find the full podcast here.

    33 seconds, 72 words

    Press play and take the transcription quiz to practice your French listening comprehension.
    (You can use the ⋮ to adjust playback speed)

    , ',,, '. ', '. « , » « ',,».
    avezcomprisimportant, 'trouverintéressent,aurezenvielire,regarder, 'écouteretc.enviecomprendrecomprendre ',vafaireplus d'efforts.vapenser « ,dois » « ',vaislirearticle,article».
    avezcomprisqueplusimportant, c'esttrouverchosesquiintéressent,chosesqueaurezenvielire,regarder, d'écouteretc.Siaenviecomprendrequelquechosecomprendre quelqu'un,vafaireplus d'efforts.vapenser « ,doisfairedufrançais » plutôt « ',vaislirearticlesuperintéressant,articleest».

    The above audio sample and transcription is from the Inner French podcast episode 001. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    Well, now

    Instead of me adding my insights, let’s hear yours. What’s opening up for you in this clip? I’m open to any and all feedback, as always. Let me know.

    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    Vous avez compris que le plus important, c’est de trouver des choses qui vous intéressent, des choses que vous aurez envie de lire, de regarder, d’écouter etc. Si on a envie de comprendre quelque chose ou de comprendre quelqu’un, on va faire plus d’efforts. On ne va pas penser « bon, maintenant je dois faire du français » mais plutôt « aujourd’hui, je vais lire un article super intéressant, et cet article est en français ».

    You have understood that the most important thing is to find things that interest you, things that you will want to read, watch, listen to, etc. If you want to understand something or someone, you will make more effort. If you want to understand something or understand someone, you will make more effort. You’re not going to think “well, now I have to do French” but rather “today I’m going to read a very interesting article, and this article is in French”.

    The above translation from Deepl. Source

    What does “bon, maintenant” mean?

    “Bon, maintenant” is a French phrase that can be translated to “Well, now” in English.

    It is commonly used to signal a change in topic or to introduce a new idea in a conversation. For example, someone might say “Bon, maintenant, parlons de quelque chose d’autre” (“Well, now, let’s talk about something else”) to shift the focus of a discussion.

    Another use of the phrase is to indicate a transition from one activity to another. For instance, a teacher might say “Bon, maintenant, sortez vos cahiers” (“Well, now, take out your notebooks”) to signal the start of a lesson.

    One interesting fact about this phrase is that it is a good example of the French language’s use of “bon” (meaning “good” or “well”) as an interjection to signal a change in tone or topic. Other similar examples include “bon alors” (well then) and “bon écoute” (listen up).

    What does “envie de” mean?

    “Envie de” is a French phrase that can be translated to “desire for” or “craving for” in English.

    It is commonly used to express a desire or craving for something. For example, someone might say “J’ai envie de manger une pizza ce soir” (“I have a craving for pizza tonight”) or “J’ai envie d’aller au cinéma” (“I have a desire to go to the movies”).

    “Envie de” can also be used in a more metaphorical sense to express a longing or yearning for something that is not necessarily a physical object or experience. For example, someone might say “J’ai envie de changer de travail” (“I have a longing to change jobs”).

    One interesting fact about this phrase is that it is often used in French advertising slogans, such as “Avez-vous envie de changement?” (“Do you have a craving for change?”) or “Venez découvrir notre nouveau menu si vous avez envie de saveurs exotiques” (“Come discover our new menu if you have a desire for exotic flavors”). The phrase’s use in advertising highlights its power as a tool for expressing desire and creating a sense of longing in the audience.

    While “envie de” is often used to express a strong craving or desire for something, it can also simply mean “want” or “feel like.” In fact, it is often used in everyday conversation to express a relatively mild desire for something, such as a drink or a snack.

    For example, someone might say “J’ai envie d’un café” (“I want a coffee”) or “J’ai envie de manger un croissant” (“I feel like eating a croissant”), without necessarily experiencing a strong craving or desire.

    So, while “envie de” can certainly be used to express a strong desire or craving, it is not always the case and can also be used to express more casual wants or feelings.

    What does “faire du” mean?

    “Fair du français” means “to speak French” in English. The phrase “faire du” can be translated to “do some” or “engage in” in English, so “faire du français” essentially means “to do some French” or “to engage in speaking French.”

    The phrase “faire du” is a common construction in French that can be used with a variety of nouns to express engaging in an activity. For example, “faire du sport” means “to do some sports” or “to engage in sports,” and “faire du shopping” means “to do some shopping” or “to engage in shopping.”

    One interesting use of “faire du” is in the expression “faire du lèche-vitrine,” which means “to window-shop” in English. The literal translation of “faire du lèche-vitrine” is “to do some window-licking,” which may seem bizarre or even unappetizing in English, but it is a common expression in French.

    Another interesting use of “faire du” is in the expression “faire du bruit,” which means “to make noise” in English. The literal translation of “faire du bruit” is “to do some noise,” which may seem odd to English speakers.

    Overall, the phrase “faire du” is a versatile and common construction in French that is used to express engaging in various activities. It can be used in many different contexts and is often paired with a noun to specify the activity being engaged in.

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