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Passerelles ep. 1, Quiz 1: comme d’habitude

    Slow it down now. It’s not all just super fast French, this clip from Passarelles podcast is built for learners. Improve your French listening comprehension with our transcription quiz. Choose your level and fill in the blanks as you listen.

    This clip is from Passerelles Episode 1. Listen and fill in what you hear below. Read more and find a translation below. Listen to the full episode here.

    20 seconds, 39 words

    This audio sample and transcription is from Passerelles ep. 1. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode

    ,. ', ', '.
    Passerelle,pensééveillercuriosité. ', ',inviteà qu'onréfléchisseensembleà.
    dansPasserelle,podcastpensééveillercuriositéapprenantesapprenants. 'semaine,comme d'habitude,inviteàprendrequelquesminutes qu'onréfléchisseensembleàquestion.

    As usual

    As usual, we are continuing with a quiz per day. We’re changing gears, especially from yesterday’s and previous quizzes from Manger!

    What do you think – too slow?

    My readers have tended to vote for slower podcasts, that’s why I’m approaching this one. It’s really meant for learners, and not necessarily French in the wild. However, I’m still interested in trying it out.

    What’s opening up for you?

    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    Bienvenue dans Passerelle, un podcast pensé pour éveiller la curiosité des apprenantes et des apprenants de français. Je m’appelle Émilie et cette semaine, comme d’habitude, je vous invite à prendre quelques minutes pour qu’on réfléchisse ensemble à une question.

    Welcome to Passerelle, a podcast designed to arouse the curiosity of learners of French. My name is Émilie and this week, as usual, I invite you to take a few minutes to think about a question together.

    The above translation from Deepl. Source

    What does “comme d’habitude” mean?

    “Comme d’habitude” is a French phrase that translates to “as usual” or “like always” in English. It is an expression used to indicate that something is happening or being done in the same way or manner as it typically does.

    The phrase “comme d’habitude” is often used in everyday conversations to refer to routine or familiar actions. It implies a sense of predictability, as if things are following a familiar pattern or routine. It can be used in various contexts, such as describing someone’s behavior, a recurring event, or an established routine.

    For example:

    • “Je me suis réveillé, j’ai pris mon café comme d’habitude.” (I woke up and had my coffee as usual.)
    • “Il est arrivé en retard, comme d’habitude.” (He arrived late, as usual.)
    • “Le restaurant était bondé, mais le serveur nous a réservé une table comme d’habitude.” (The restaurant was crowded, but the waiter saved us a table as usual.)

    In popular culture, the phrase gained significant recognition through the French song “Comme d’habitude,” which was later adapted into the well-known English version, “My Way,” famously performed by Frank Sinatra.

    What does “réfléchisse” mean?

    The term “réfléchisse” is the third-person singular present subjunctive form of the verb “réfléchir” in French. “Réfléchir” means “to reflect” or “to think” in English.

    The subjunctive mood is used to express doubt, uncertainty, desire, or subjective feelings. The form “réfléchisse” is specifically used when referring to someone else (he/she) reflecting or thinking about something.

    Here’s an example of how it can be used in a sentence:

    • Il faut que Sophie réfléchisse avant de prendre une décision. (It is necessary for Sophie to reflect before making a decision.)

    In this example, “réfléchisse” indicates that Sophie is being urged or advised to think carefully or consider different aspects before making her decision.

    It’s important to note that the subjunctive mood is commonly used in French in various contexts, such as expressing wishes, recommendations, opinions, doubts, or hypothetical situations. The subjunctive form of verbs can vary depending on the subject and tense, and it is used in conjunction with specific conjunctions or expressions that trigger its usage.

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    Slow it down now. It’s not all just super fast French, this clip from Passarelles podcast is built for learners. Improve your French listening comprehension with our transcription quiz. Choose your level and fill in the blanks as you listen.

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