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Passerelles ep. 1, Quiz 31: aussi

    You may already know “aussi” and “en partie” but hear them both again in this clip of French in real life. Choose how much you can see of the transcript, then fill in the blanks with what you hear. Practice daily with free quizzes updated at 12am NY time, and improve your French listening skills…

    This clip is from Passerelles Episode 1. Listen and fill in what you hear below. Read more and find a translation below. Listen to the full episode here.

    9 seconds, 16 words

    This audio sample and transcription is from Passerelles ep. 1. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode

    ' '.
    changement s'expliquephénomène 'sociétéconsommation.
    Cechangement s'expliquepartieparphénomène d'américanisationparsociétéconsommation.

    as well

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    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    Ce changement s’explique en partie par un phénomène d’américanisation et par la société de consommation aussi.

    This change can be explained in part by the phenomenon of Americanization, and also by the consumer society.

    The above translation from Deepl. Source

    What does “en partie” mean?

    “En partie” is a French expression that translates to “partly” or “in part” in English. It is composed of the preposition “en” (in) and the noun “partie” (part).

    “En partie” is used to indicate that something is only partially true, valid, or applicable. It suggests that while there is some truth or relevance to a statement or situation, it is not entirely accurate or complete. Example: “Le projet a réussi en partie grâce à l’implication de l’équipe.” (The project succeeded partly thanks to the team’s involvement.)

    The exact meaning of “en partie” may vary depending on the context. It can indicate a degree of involvement, contribution, or responsibility in a particular outcome. Example: “Il est responsable en partie des résultats décevants.” (He is partly responsible for the disappointing results.)

    In addition to “en partie,” you may encounter other expressions with a similar meaning, such as “partiellement” (partially) or “dans une certaine mesure” (to some extent).

    When used in a negative context, “en partie” suggests that something is not entirely to blame or not entirely responsible for a negative outcome. Example: “Le mauvais temps n’est pas en partie responsable de l’échec de l’événement.” (The bad weather is not partly responsible for the failure of the event.)

    “En partie” can be used in various contexts, including discussions about achievements, responsibilities, causes of events, and factors contributing to specific outcomes. Example: “Le succès du film est en partie dû à sa distribution internationale.” (The success of the movie is partly due to its international distribution.)

    Overall, “en partie” is a useful expression in French, allowing speakers to provide nuanced descriptions and clarify the extent to which something is true or applicable. It is an essential phrase for expressing degrees of influence or involvement in different situations.

    What does “aussi” mean?

    “Aussi” is a versatile and commonly used French adverb that translates to “also,” “too,” “as well,” or “so” in English. It plays various roles in a sentence and can convey different meanings depending on the context. Here are some key points about “aussi”:

    1. Addition and Similarity:
      • “Aussi” is often used to add information or to indicate that something is similar or comparable to something else.
      • Example: “J’aime le chocolat, et mon frère aussi.” (I like chocolate, and my brother does too.)
    1. Equivalence:
      • “Aussi” can express equivalence or agreement between two statements.
      • Example: “Elle est intelligente, aussi elle réussit bien à l’école.” (She is intelligent, so she does well in school.)
    1. Consequently:
      • “Aussi” can be used as a consequence marker to show that one action or event results in another.
      • Example: “Il a beaucoup travaillé, aussi il a réussi son examen.” (He worked hard, so he passed his exam.)
    1. Placement:
      • “Aussi” can appear at the beginning, middle, or end of a sentence, depending on the emphasis and structure. Examples:
        • “Aussi, il a réussi son examen.” (Also, he passed his exam.)
        • “Il a aussi réussi son examen.” (He also passed his exam.)
        • “Il a réussi son examen aussi.” (He passed his exam too.)
    1. Difference from “très” and “beaucoup”:
      • While “aussi” can be used to intensify the meaning of an adjective or adverb, it differs from “très” and “beaucoup.” “Très” means “very” or “extremely,” while “beaucoup” means “a lot” or “much.” “Aussi” indicates similarity or addition rather than intensity. Examples:
        • “Il est très intelligent.” (He is very intelligent.)
        • “Il est aussi intelligent que son frère.” (He is as intelligent as his brother.)
        • “Il est beaucoup intelligent.” (Incorrect usage; should be “Il est très intelligent.”)
    1. As a Comparison:
      • In comparisons, “aussi” can be used to mean “as… as.”
      • Example: “Elle est aussi belle que sa sœur.” (She is as beautiful as her sister.)

    Overall, “aussi” is a common and versatile adverb used in various contexts to add information, express similarity, indicate consequence, and more. It is an essential word for expressing comparisons, agreement, and additional details in French sentences.

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    You may already know “aussi” and “en partie” but hear them both again in this clip of French in real life. Choose how much you can see of the transcript, then fill in the blanks with what you hear. Practice daily with free quizzes updated at 12am NY time, and improve your French listening skills…

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