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Transfert s01e22, Quiz 12: pour moi toute seule

    Take on this faster clip and see how much you can pick up. I found these phrases interesting: “Plus tard”, “peut-être”, “pour moi toute seule”, “jusqu’à la fin de mes jours”. Can you hear them all? Take it on and fill in the blanks as you listen. Take today’s quiz!

    Learn French with a podcast snippet! This clip is is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    10 seconds, 41 words
    ,, - ',, '. '.
    ,dit, -que j'aimeraisavoir,feraisseule,voyaisrestermêmehomme 'fin. C'étaitpossible.
    Plustard,suisdit, peut-êtreque j'aimeraisavoirenfant,leferaistouteseule,parcequenevoyaispasresteravecmêmehomme jusqu'àfinjours. C'étaitpaspossible.

    The above audio sample and transcription is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    for me alone

    What’s opening up for you with this clip?

    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    Plus tard, je me suis dit, peut-être que j’aimerais avoir un enfant, mais je le ferais pour moi toute seule, parce que je ne me voyais pas rester avec le même homme jusqu’à la fin de mes jours. C’était pas possible.

    Later, I said to myself, maybe I’d like to have a child, but I’d do it for myself, because I couldn’t see myself staying with the same man for the rest of my life. It just wasn’t possible.

    The above translation from Deepl

    What does “plus tard” mean?

    Meaning and Usage:
    “Plus tard” is a French phrase meaning “later.” It is used to refer to a moment in time that will occur after the current moment. It can be vague, referring to any time in the future, or it can be more specific when used in certain contexts.

    Examples:

    1. “On se voit plus tard?” (Shall we meet later?)
    2. “Je le ferai plus tard.” (I will do it later.)

    Context:
    “Plus tard” can be used in a variety of contexts, ranging from casual conversations to formal discussions. It is a common phrase used to schedule or reschedule events, as well as to postpone tasks.

    Synonyms and Antonyms:
    Synonyms:

    • “ultérieurement” (later on)
    • “après” (after)

    Antonyms:

    • “maintenant” (now)
    • “tout de suite” (right away)

    Variations and Combinations:

    • “au plus tard”: This means “at the latest.” For example, “Il faut que je parte au plus tard à 18 heures” (I need to leave by 6 PM at the latest).
    • “plus tard dans la vie”: This means “later in life.” For example, “Il a trouvé sa vocation plus tard dans la vie” (He found his vocation later in life).

    Idiomatic Usage:

    • “À plus tard!”: This is a casual way to say “See you later!”

    Cultural Notes:
    “Plus tard” is a common and straightforward way to talk about future time in French. It reflects the importance of context in understanding time references, as “later” can mean different things depending on the situation. Understanding the nuance of “plus tard” can be particularly important in social settings, where punctuality and clear communication are valued.

    What does “peut-être” mean?

    Meaning and Usage:
    “Peut-être” is a French adverb that translates to “maybe” or “perhaps” in English. It is used to express uncertainty or to indicate that something is possible but not certain.

    Examples:

    1. “Peut-être qu’il va pleuvoir demain.” (Maybe it will rain tomorrow.)
    2. “Peut-être qu’elle a oublié notre rendez-vous.” (Perhaps she forgot our meeting.)

    Context:
    “Peut-être” can be used in a variety of contexts, from casual conversations to more formal settings. It is a versatile word that helps to convey a sense of doubt or indecision.

    Synonyms and Antonyms:
    Synonyms:

    • “éventuellement” (possibly)
    • “probablement” (probably) – though this conveys a higher degree of certainty

    Antonyms:

    • “certainement” (certainly)
    • “absolument” (absolutely)

    Variations and Combinations:

    • “peut-être que”: When followed by a clause, “peut-être” becomes “peut-être que.” For example, “Peut-être que je viendrai demain” (Maybe I will come tomorrow).

    Idiomatic Usage:

    • “Peut-être bien que oui, peut-être bien que non”: This is a playful and idiomatic way to say “maybe yes, maybe no,” often used when someone wants to remain mysterious or non-committal.

    What does “pour moi toute seule” mean?

    Meaning and Usage:
    The phrase “pour moi toute seule” translates to “for me alone” or “all for myself” in English. It conveys a sense of exclusivity or possession, indicating that something is intended to be enjoyed or used by the speaker alone, without sharing with others.

    Examples:

    1. “J’ai acheté ce gâteau pour moi toute seule.” (I bought this cake all for myself.)
    2. “Cette journée est pour moi toute seule, je vais en profiter pour me reposer.” (This day is all for myself; I’m going to take advantage of it to rest.)

    Context:
    This phrase is often used in a casual or informal context, and it can be applied to various situations, from mundane daily activities to more special or indulgent moments. It might be used playfully or seriously, depending on the context.

    Synonyms and Antonyms:
    Synonyms:

    • “juste pour moi” (just for me)
    • “rien que pour moi” (only for me)

    Variations:
    You can adjust the phrase to refer to different people:

    • “pour toi tout seul” (all for yourself)
    • “pour lui tout seul” (all for himself)

    What does “jusqu’à la fin de mes jours” mean?

    Meaning and Usage:
    The phrase “jusqu’à la fin de mes jours” translates to “until the end of my days” or “for the rest of my life” in English. It is a poetic and emphatic way to express commitment, dedication, or enduring feelings toward something or someone.

    Examples:

    1. “Je t’aimerai jusqu’à la fin de mes jours.” (I will love you until the end of my days.)
    2. “Je promets de chérir ces souvenirs jusqu’à la fin de mes jours.” (I promise to cherish these memories for the rest of my life.)

    Context:
    This phrase is typically used in a heartfelt or solemn context, often related to love, commitment, or profound experiences. It can be found in literature, poetry, and romantic dialogues.

    Synonyms:

    • “pour toujours” (forever)
    • “à jamais” (forever)

    Variations:
    You can use variations to express a similar sentiment towards someone else:

    • “jusqu’à la fin de tes jours” (until the end of your days)

    Cultural Notes:
    In French culture, this phrase might be associated with romantic gestures, literature, and film, as it captures a depth of emotion and commitment that is often idealized in these mediums.

    Using this phrase shows a deep connection and a willingness to commit for a very long time, if not forever. It reflects the value placed on long-term commitments and deep, enduring connections in French-speaking cultures.

    What is opening up for you?

    Comment below with the words you thought you heard, where you struggled, where you surprised yourself, or what you thought about this clip. Every little bit inspires other learners, thank you for being that inspiration to others on their French fluency journey!

    Take on this faster clip and see how much you can pick up. I found these phrases interesting: “Plus tard”, “peut-être”, “pour moi toute seule”, “jusqu’à la fin de mes jours”. Can you hear them all? Take it on and fill in the blanks as you listen. Take today’s quiz!

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