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Transfert s01e22, quiz 2: un foyer

    I’m loving some of the nuance in this clip. Hear phrases like: “débarque”, “un foyer”, “auprès des”, and “malmenés et meurtris”. I wanted to highlight foyer because it is different from our word foyer in English, even our use of “hearth” in English doesn’t contain the depth of meaning here. Take on today’s fast quiz!

    Learn French with a podcast snippet! This clip is is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

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    ' 'Barras qu'elleadapté 'Gillesraconte ' 'quidébarqueorphelinatretrouvefoyerauprèsmalmenésmeurtris.
    C'estfilm d'animationClaudeBarras qu'elleaadapté 'livreGillesçaraconte l'histoire 'garçonquidébarquedansorphelinatretrouvefoyerauprèsenfantsmalmenésmeurtris.

    The above audio sample and transcription is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

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    What’s opening up for you with this clip?

    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    C’est un film d’animation de Claude Barras qu’elle a adapté d’un livre de Gilles Paris et ça raconte l’histoire d’un petit garçon qui débarque dans un orphelinat et retrouve un foyer auprès des enfants malmenés et meurtris.

    It’s an animated film by Claude Barras, adapted from a book by Gilles Paris, and tells the story of a little boy who arrives at an orphanage and finds a home among battered and bruised children.

    The above translation from Deepl

    What does “débarque” mean?

    “Débarque” originates from the verb “débarquer,” which has various meanings and contexts of use in the French language. Let’s delve into it.

    Meaning and Usage:

    • Translation: “Débarque” can be translated as “lands” or “arrives” depending on the context.
    • Description: This term is used in different contexts to indicate arrival or landing.Example 1: “Il débarque sans prévenir.” (He arrives without warning.) Example 2: “L’armée débarque sur la plage.” (The army lands on the beach.)

    Context:

    “Débarque” can be used in both formal and informal contexts, though the type of arrival or landing it describes may dictate the formality.

    Synonyms:

    • Arrive
    • Vient (comes)

    Antonyms:

    • Embarque (as in to board or embark)

    Variations:

    • “Débarquer” (infinitive form)
    • “Débarquement” (noun form, often used to describe a military landing, like “Le Débarquement” – The [D-Day] Landing)

    Idiomatic Usage:

    • “Débarquer de la dernière pluie” (lit: to arrive with the last rain) is an idiom meaning to be very naïve or inexperienced. Example: “Il ne faut pas lui en vouloir, il débarque de la dernière pluie.” (Don’t be too hard on him; he’s still wet behind the ears.)

    Cultural Notes:

    • “Le Débarquement” specifically refers to the Allied landing in Normandy during World War II, a significant historical event in France and globally.
    • The casual use of “débarquer” to mean arriving somewhere without any notice can convey a sense of spontaneity, surprise, or sometimes inconvenience, often depending on the speaker’s tone and context.
    • In cinematic or literary contexts, “débarquer” might be used to depict sudden or unexpected arrivals that trigger a series of events or alter the plot.

    “Débarque” encapsulates various nuances of arrivals and landings, from the historically significant to the casually unexpected, embodying both the tangible and metaphorical intersections of journeys and destinations in the French language and culture.

    What does “un foyer” mean?

    Meaning and Usage:

    • Translation: “Un foyer” can be translated to “a hearth” in its most literal sense. However, in various contexts, it can mean “a home,” “a household,” or even a specialized residence or institution.Example: “Il a grandi dans un foyer aimant.” (He grew up in a loving home.)Example: “Il a été placé dans un foyer pour jeunes en difficulté.” (He was placed in a residential home for troubled youth.)

    Context:

    “Un foyer” can be used in a wide range of contexts. Depending on the setting, it could denote warmth and family or a more institutional setting for specific groups of individuals.

    Synonyms:

    • Maison (house or home)
    • Domicile (residence or dwelling)
    • Centre (center, can sometimes be used in the context of institutions)

    Variations:

    • Foyer de vie (residential facility for adults with disabilities)
    • Foyer d’accueil (reception or welcome center)

    Idiomatic Usage:

    • Foyer familial: Refers to the family home or household. For instance, “retourner au foyer familial” means to return to one’s family home.
    • Foyer d’épidémie: Literally translates as “epidemic hearth,” referring to the origin or main area of an epidemic.

    Cultural Notes:

    • Institutional Context: In France, “foyers” as institutions often offer more than just lodging. They can provide support, education, and social integration, especially for specific groups like troubled youth or migrants.
    • Evolution of Usage: The term “foyer” in the context of an institution has become more prevalent due to changes in the social welfare system and the evolution of structures replacing more traditional institutions like “orphelinats” (orphanages).
    • Cultural Significance: The hearth (“foyer” in its literal sense) has historical significance in many cultures, including France, as the center of the home—a place of warmth, gathering, and family bonding.
    • Literary and Film Representation: The concept of “foyer,” both as a hearth and a social institution, appears in French literature and films, showcasing its central role in French societal structures and family life.

    “Un foyer” embodies both the warmth and intimacy of home and broader societal efforts to provide care and support for specific populations. It holds a multifaceted role in the French language and culture, reflecting both personal experiences and broader social dynamics.

    What does “auprès des” mean?

    Meaning and Usage:

    • Translation: “Auprès des” can be translated to “close to,” “near,” or “by the side of” in a literal sense. In a more figurative context, it often means “with” or “among.”Example: “Elle habite auprès des montagnes.” (She lives close to the mountains.)Example: “Il est très populaire auprès des jeunes.” (He is very popular among the youth.)

    Context:

    The phrase “auprès de” (of which “auprès des” is a variation when referring to plural entities) can be used in various contexts to denote physical proximity or, more often, a figurative closeness or association with a group or concept.

    Synonyms:

    • Près de (close to)
    • Avec (with)
    • Parmi (among)

    Variations:

    • Auprès de: Used when referring to singular entities. For instance, “auprès de lui” means “close to him” or “with him.”

    Idiomatic Usage:

    • Auprès de mon arbre: This is the title of a famous song by Georges Brassens. The phrase translates to “next to my tree,” and the song speaks of the simple joy and comfort found in familiar and cherished places.

    Cultural Notes:

    • Historical Uses: Historically, “auprès de” was used in a more literal sense, often denoting physical closeness. Over time, its figurative uses, especially in the context of relationships or associations with groups, have become more prevalent.
    • Popularity in Literature: The term has been widely used in French literature to evoke both literal and figurative closeness. It can be found in works ranging from classic literature to contemporary pieces.
    • In Diplomacy: In official and diplomatic contexts, “auprès de” can be used to denote representation or liaising. For instance, “Ambassadeur auprès de l’ONU” means “Ambassador to the UN.”

    “Auprès des” is a versatile phrase in the French language, capturing both the idea of physical proximity and a broader sense of association or alignment with groups or concepts. Whether in poetry, everyday conversation, or formal diplomatic language, it evokes a sense of closeness and relation.

    What does “malmenés et meurtris” mean?

    Meaning and Usage:

    • Translation: The phrase translates to “mistreated and bruised” in English.
      • Malmenés: This word comes from the verb “mal mener” which means to handle roughly or treat badly.Example: “Les prisonniers étaient malmenés par leurs gardiens.” (The prisoners were mistreated by their guards.)
      • Meurtris: Derived from the verb “meurtrir,” it refers to causing a bruise or injury, often used in a literal sense but can also be used figuratively to mean hurt or damaged.Example: “Après la chute, sa jambe était meurtrie.” (After the fall, her leg was bruised.)

    Context:

    The combination of “malmenés et meurtris” provides a powerful imagery of someone or something that has faced hardship or ill-treatment. The phrase can be used in both literal contexts, such as describing physical harm, or figuratively, like describing emotional trauma or the challenges faced by a group of people.

    Synonyms:

    • For Malmenés:
      • Maltraités (abused)
      • Maltournés (roughed up)
    • For Meurtris:
      • Contusionnés (contused)
      • Blessés (injured)

    Idiomatic Usage:

    • Meurtri jusqu’à l’âme: This phrase, translating to “bruised to the soul,” is a poetic way to express deep emotional pain or trauma.

    Cultural Notes:

    • Literary and Poetic Usage: “Malmenés et meurtris” is a phrase that might be encountered in literature, especially in contexts where the author wants to emphasize suffering, struggle, or trauma. The combined imagery of mistreatment and bruising serves as a potent metaphor for hardship.
    • Socio-political Discussions: In discussions about societal issues or historical events, the phrase could be used to describe communities or groups of people who have faced oppression or ill-treatment.

    In French discourse, “malmenés et meurtris” carries a weight of emotional or physical hardship. Whether evoking the challenges faced by individuals or groups, or describing literal wounds and injuries, the phrase captures the essence of pain, struggle, and resilience.

    What is opening up for you?

    Comment below with the words you thought you heard, where you struggled, where you surprised yourself, or what you thought about this clip. Every little bit inspires other learners, thank you for being that inspiration to others on their French fluency journey!

    I’m loving some of the nuance in this clip. Hear phrases like: “débarque”, “un foyer”, “auprès des”, and “malmenés et meurtris”. I wanted to highlight foyer because it is different from our word foyer in English, even our use of “hearth” in English doesn’t contain the depth of meaning here. Take on today’s fast quiz!

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