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Transfert s01e22, quiz 3: nous manquent

    French irl doesn’t get much more real than what someone said in their award acceptance speech. Esoteric and nuanced, can you pick it all up? Hear words like “les récits” and “nous manquent” among others. How much of this short clip can you follow? Hear it and take the transcription quiz today!

    Learn French with a podcast snippet! This clip is is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    8 seconds, 28 words
    , « , '. »
    ,Sciammadit « récitsparlenttouchentindividuellement, 'manquentcollectivement. »
    scène,Sciammaadit « croisquerécitsquiparlentquitouchentindividuellement, c'estrécitsquimanquentcollectivement. »

    The above audio sample and transcription is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    we miss

    What’s opening up for you with this clip?

    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    Sur scène, Sciamma a dit « Je crois que les récits qui nous parlent et qui nous touchent individuellement, c’est aussi les récits qui nous manquent collectivement. »

    On stage, Sciamma said, “I believe that the stories that speak to us and touch us individually are also the stories that we collectively miss.”

    The above translation from Deepl

    What does “les récits” mean?

    Meaning and Usage:

    • Translation: The term “récits” translates to “stories” or “narratives” in English.
      • Récit: A noun that signifies a detailed account, narration, or story about events. It can refer to both fiction and non-fiction narratives.Example: “Le récit de son aventure m’a passionné.” (The story of his adventure fascinated me.)

    Context:

    “Récit” is used in various contexts, from literature to journalism to everyday conversation. It can refer to a personal account of an event, a tale from history, a news report, or a fictional story.

    Synonyms:

    • Histoire: Often used interchangeably with “récit” but can be broader. While “histoire” can also mean “story,” it can also refer to “history” in general.
    • Narration: A detailed telling or representation of a story or an event.
    • Compte rendu: More like “report” or “account,” often used in formal or journalistic contexts.

    Idiomatic Usage:

    • Récit de vie: This phrase means “life story” or “biography,” referring to the account of one’s personal experiences throughout their life.

    Cultural Notes:

    • Literary Context: In French literature, the term “récit” is significant. Many renowned French authors, from Marcel Proust to Marguerite Duras, have been celebrated for their compelling “récits.”
    • Oral Tradition: Much of France’s rich history and cultural traditions are preserved through oral “récits.” Folk tales, legends, and personal stories passed down generations maintain the cultural fabric of various regions in France.
    • Modern Usage: With the advent of social media and digital platforms, “récits” have found new avenues. Many young French people use blogs, YouTube, and podcasts to share their “récits de vie” or experiences on specific topics, thus adapting the age-old tradition of storytelling to modern means.

    “Récit” in French culture and language holds an essential place as it not only conveys stories but also preserves histories, shares experiences, and offers detailed accounts of events. Whether in literature, media, or everyday conversations, “récits” help shape, convey, and understand diverse perspectives and experiences.

    What does “nous manquent” mean?

    Meaning and Usage:

    The verb “manquer” primarily translates to “to miss” in English. However, the construction in French can be a bit tricky because its structure often appears reversed when compared to its English counterpart.

    • “Nous manquent” specifically translates to “are missing to us.” It’s used when speaking about something or someone that is lacking or absent and is missed by the speaker(s).Example: “Les bons moments nous manquent.” (We miss the good times.)

    Context:

    “Manquer” can be used in various contexts, from expressing emotional absence, like missing a person, to noting the physical absence of an object.

    Synonyms:

    • Être absent: To be absent.
    • Faire défaut: To be lacking.

    Idiomatic Usage:

    • “Manquer de” + noun: This construction means “to lack” something. Example: “Il manque de confiance.” (He lacks confidence.)
    • “Manquer à” + person: When referring to missing someone. Example: “Tu me manques.” (I miss you.) Note the inversion; it literally translates to “You are missed by me.”

    Cultural Notes:

    • Expressing Emotions: French people often use “manquer” to express their feelings of longing for someone. It’s common to see messages like “Tu me manques” (I miss you) in correspondence between loved ones.
    • Literal Usage: In everyday situations, such as at a grocery store, one might say “Il manque du lait” (There’s no milk left/We’re out of milk) to indicate the physical absence of an item.
    • Connotations: “Manquer” can also be used to convey opportunities that weren’t seized. For instance, “manquer le bus” means “to miss the bus.”
    • Reversed Construction: One of the most important things for learners to remember is the inverted structure when using “manquer” to express missing someone. This inversion is a common source of confusion for non-native speakers.
    • Historical Context: “Manquer” has been used in literature and historical documents to express various sentiments, from missing one’s homeland to expressing regret for missed opportunities.
    • Modern Usage: Just like in other languages, expressing feelings of missing someone or something remains prevalent in modern French. With the digital age, phrases like “Tu me manques” can be commonly seen in text messages, social media posts, and other forms of digital communication among French speakers.

    In essence, while “manquer” might seem straightforward at first, its usage in French requires careful attention to its construction. The sentiment it conveys, of missing or lacking, is universally relatable, making it a versatile and frequently used verb in the French language.

    What is opening up for you?

    Comment below with the words you thought you heard, where you struggled, where you surprised yourself, or what you thought about this clip. Every little bit inspires other learners, thank you for being that inspiration to others on their French fluency journey!

    French irl doesn’t get much more real than what someone said in their award acceptance speech. Esoteric and nuanced, can you pick it all up? Hear words like “les récits” and “nous manquent” among others. How much of this short clip can you follow? Hear it and take the transcription quiz today!

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