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Transfert s01e22, Quiz 38: ça devient urgent

    FacebookTweetPinLinkedIn Learn French with a podcast snippet! This clip is is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here. The above audio sample and transcription is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here. it’s becoming urgent What’s opening up for… Read…

    Learn French with a podcast snippet! This clip is is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    12 seconds, 44 words
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    Donc 'passé s'est s'estpresquedit,.Yannick,, -.donc,Yannick,falloirviennes,devienturgent.
    Donc j'aipassémoison s'eston s'estpresqueriendit,passaisjournéeslui.Yannickétait,frère,étaiten -.doncluiaidit,Yannick,vafalloirqueviennes,devienturgent.

    The above audio sample and transcription is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    it’s becoming urgent

    What’s opening up for you with this clip?

    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    Donc j’ai passé deux mois où on s’est on s’est presque rien dit, mais je passais mes journées avec lui. Yannick était, mon frère, était en aux Etats-Unis. Et donc je lui ai dit, Yannick, il va falloir que tu viennes, ça devient urgent.

    So I spent two months where we hardly said anything to each other, but I spent my days with him. Yannick, my brother, was in the United States. And so I said to him, Yannick, you’re going to have to come, it’s getting urgent.

    The above translation from Deepl

    What does “on s’est presque rien dit” mean?

    The phrase “on s’est presque rien dit” translates to “we hardly said anything to each other” or “we almost said nothing to each other” in English. It’s a reflection on a conversation or interaction where very little was communicated.

    Components of the Phrase:

    1. “On”: This is an impersonal pronoun, often used in French to mean “we,” “one,” or “people in general.”
    2. “S’est”: A reflexive construction, part of “se dire,” which means “to say to each other” or “to tell each other.”
    3. “Presque rien”: Literally translates to “almost nothing.” When used with “dit” (said), it emphasizes the minimal amount of communication that took place.
    4. “Dit”: The past participle of “dire,” meaning “said” or “told.”

    Usage and Context:

    • Reflecting on Communication: “On s’est presque rien dit” is typically used to describe situations where communication was minimal or superficial.
    • Expressing Relationship Dynamics: The phrase can imply a range of emotions or social dynamics, including awkwardness, estrangement, or a mutual understanding that requires few words.

    Examples:

    • “Lors du dîner, on s’est presque rien dit.” (During dinner, we hardly said anything to each other.)
    • “Après la dispute, on s’est presque rien dit.” (After the argument, we almost said nothing to each other.)

    Cultural Notes:

    In French, expressions like “on s’est presque rien dit” reflect the language’s capacity to concisely convey complex interpersonal dynamics. Such phrases are common in describing social interactions with a focus on the quality and quantity of communication.

    Summary:

    “On s’est presque rien dit” is a French phrase used to express that very little was said or communicated between people. It combines the reflexive form “se dire” with “presque rien” to emphasize the scarcity of conversation or interaction. This phrase is useful for discussing situations where communication was notably limited or lacking.

    What does “il va falloir que” mean?

    The phrase “il va falloir que” translates to “it is going to be necessary that” or “it will be necessary to” in English. It is used to express an impending necessity or a requirement for something to happen in the future.

    Structure and Usage:

    • Impersonal Expression: “Il va falloir” is an impersonal expression, where “il” does not refer to a specific subject but rather is used in a general sense, similar to the English “it” in “it is raining.”
    • Future Necessity: This phrase indicates that something will need to occur or be done in the near future.
    • Subjunctive Mood: “Il va falloir que” is typically followed by a verb in the subjunctive mood because it introduces a statement of necessity, which is inherently subjective or uncertain.

    Examples:

    • “Il va falloir que tu étudies plus pour réussir l’examen.” (You are going to need to study more to pass the exam.)
    • “Il va falloir qu’on prenne une décision rapidement.” (It will be necessary for us to make a decision quickly.)

    Context:

    • Planning and Decision Making: This phrase is commonly used in contexts of planning, advising, or when a decision or action is required in response to future circumstances.
    • Formal and Informal Use: “Il va falloir que” can be used in both formal and informal situations. It is a standard expression for conveying the need for future actions or decisions.

    Nuance:

    • Sense of Urgency: There is often a sense of urgency or importance associated with “il va falloir que,” implying that the subsequent action is not just a suggestion but a requirement.

    Summary:

    “Il va falloir que” is a French phrase expressing that something will need to happen or be done in the future. It conveys a sense of necessity or requirement and is commonly followed by a verb in the subjunctive mood. This expression is versatile and can be used in various contexts where future planning, decision-making, or advising is involved.

    What does “ça devient urgent” mean?

    The phrase “ça devient urgent” translates to “it’s becoming urgent” or “it is getting urgent” in English. It’s used to indicate that a situation or need is increasing in urgency and requires prompt attention or action.

    Usage and Context:

    • Expressing Escalating Urgency: The phrase is typically used when a situation that was not initially urgent has grown in importance or criticality over time.
    • Versatile Use: “Ça devient urgent” can be applied to various contexts, from everyday tasks to more serious scenarios.

    Examples:

    1. In Work or Professional Settings: “Il faut finir ce rapport, ça devient urgent.” (We need to finish this report, it’s becoming urgent.)
    2. In Personal Situations: “Nous devons voir le médecin, ça devient urgent.” (We need to see the doctor, it’s getting urgent.)

    Commonality:

    • While the direct English equivalent “it’s becoming urgent” may not be a common everyday expression, the concept is universally understood. In French, “ça devient urgent” is a regularly used phrase to emphasize the growing need for immediate action or resolution.

    Nuance and Tone:

    • Increasing Intensity: The phrase often conveys a sense of escalating intensity or severity in a situation.
    • Call to Action: It can also serve as a call to action, prompting others to respond to the situation’s growing urgency.

    Cultural Notes:

    • In French, direct and clear communication about the urgency of matters is appreciated, especially in professional or serious personal contexts. “Ça devient urgent” is straightforward in conveying that a situation can no longer be deferred and needs prompt attention.

    Summary:

    “Ça devient urgent” is a French phrase used to indicate that a situation is becoming urgent or that the need for action is increasing. Common in both professional and personal contexts, it serves as a clear indication that immediate attention or action is required due to the escalating urgency of the situation. While the exact English translation might not be commonly used, the concept is widely understood and expressed in various ways in English.

    What is opening up for you?

    Comment below with the words you thought you heard, where you struggled, where you surprised yourself, or what you thought about this clip. Every little bit inspires other learners, thank you for being that inspiration to others on their French fluency journey!

    FacebookTweetPinLinkedIn Learn French with a podcast snippet! This clip is is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here. The above audio sample and transcription is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here. it’s becoming urgent What’s opening up for… Read…

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