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Transfert s01e22, Quiz 44: qui souffre

    Improve your French listening skills with this clip of French in real life. It’s not a fast one. See if you can catch all 50 words in the clip. Set your level and fill in the blanks fo our listening quiz as you go.

    Learn French with a podcast snippet! This clip is is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    21 seconds, 50 words
    , '. -,,,,,.
    ,euh l'EverestBaseCamp.marcher -,seule,guide,Sherpa,carte,euheuhcœurquisouffre.
    prendsmois,prendssacàdosmefaiseuh l'EverestBaseCamp.Doncfaismoisàmarcherpendant -heuresparjour,touteseule,sansguide,sansSherpa,carte,euhsacàdoseuhcœurquisouffre.

    The above audio sample and transcription is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    that suffers

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    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    Je prends 4 mois, je prends mon sac à dos et je me fais euh l’Everest Base Camp. Donc je fais 4 mois à marcher pendant 8-10 heures par jour, toute seule, sans guide, sans Sherpa, avec ma carte, euh mon sac à dos et euh et mon cœur qui souffre.

    I take 4 months, pack my rucksack and go to Everest Base Camp. So I do 4 months walking 8-10 hours a day, on my own, without a guide, without a Sherpa, with my map, uh my backpack and uh my suffering heart.

    The above translation from Deepl

    What does “mon cœur qui souffre” mean?

    “Mon cœur qui souffre” translates to “my heart that suffers” or “my heart which is suffering” in English. This phrase expresses emotional pain or distress.

    The Verb “Souffre”:

    • “Souffre”: This is the present tense form of the verb “souffrir,” which means “to suffer” in English.
    • Indication of Pain or Distress: In this context, “souffre” is used to convey the idea of experiencing pain, which can be emotional or physical, but typically emotional when referring to the heart.

    Usage and Context:

    • Emotional Expression: “Mon cœur qui souffre” is often used in poetic, literary, or deeply emotional contexts to express feelings of heartache, sadness, or emotional turmoil.
    • Metaphorical Use: The heart is frequently used metaphorically in many languages to represent emotions. Thus, the phrase symbolizes deep emotional suffering.

    Examples:

    • In a poem or song: “Mon cœur qui souffre d’amour perdu.” (My heart that suffers from lost love.)
    • Expressing personal feelings: “Je sens mon cœur qui souffre en pensant à toi.” (I feel my heart suffering when I think of you.)

    Nuance:

    • Depth of Emotion: This phrase typically conveys a deep level of emotional pain. It’s more intense than simply saying “I’m sad” or “I’m upset.”

    Summary:

    “Mon cœur qui souffre” means “my heart that suffers” or “my heart which is suffering,” primarily used to express deep emotional pain or distress. The verb “souffre,” from “souffrir,” indicates the act of suffering, typically emotional in this context. This phrase is commonly found in poetic or highly emotional expressions and is reflective of the French language’s capacity to articulate profound emotional states.

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    Improve your French listening skills with this clip of French in real life. It’s not a fast one. See if you can catch all 50 words in the clip. Set your level and fill in the blanks fo our listening quiz as you go.

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