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Transfert s01e22, Quiz 52: tous les trois

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    16 seconds, 22 words
    ,,,,.
    euh,estàtable,,juste,faisaitcachotteries.
    euhfois,estàtable,déjeuner,juste,parlemamanquifaisaitquelquescachotteries.

    The above audio sample and transcription is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    all three

    What’s opening up for you with this clip?

    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    Et euh une fois, on est à table, déjeuner, juste tous les trois, et on parle de maman qui faisait quelques cachotteries.

    And uh one time, we’re at the table, having lunch, just the three of us, and we’re talking about Mom, who was being a little secretive.

    The above translation from Deepl

    What does “on est à table” mean?

    The phrase “on est à table” translates to “we are at the table” in English. It’s commonly used to indicate that people are sitting at the table, typically for a meal.

    Usage and Context:

    • Mealtime Context: “On est à table” is most often used to signify that people are gathered at the dining table, usually ready to eat or already eating.
    • Calling to Join a Meal: It can also be used to inform others that it’s mealtime, suggesting that they should come to the table.

    Examples:

    1. Announcing Mealtime: “Venez, on est à table !” (Come, we are at the table!)
    2. During a Phone Call: “Je ne peux pas parler maintenant, on est à table.” (I can’t talk right now, we are at the table.)

    Nuance:

    • Focus on Togetherness: The phrase emphasizes the communal aspect of mealtime, highlighting the social nature of dining in many cultures.
    • Indicative of Routine: It often reflects the routine or ritual aspect of meals in daily life.

    Cultural Notes:

    • Importance of Mealtime in French Culture: In French culture, meals are often a social and family affair, and “on est à table” reflects the significance of gathering for meals. It underlines the communal and social aspects of dining.

    Summary:

    “On est à table” means “we are at the table” in French, typically used in the context of mealtime to indicate that people are gathered around the table for eating. It’s a phrase that underscores the communal nature of meals, often used to announce that it’s time to eat or to explain that one is currently occupied with dining. The phrase reflects the cultural importance of shared meals in many societies, especially in French culture.

    What does “tous les trois” mean?

    “Tous les trois” translates to “all three” or “the three of us/them” in English. It’s a phrase used to refer to a group of three people, including the speaker if it’s “us.”

    Usage and Context:

    • Referring to a Group of Three: This phrase is used when talking about a group consisting of three individuals.
    • Inclusive of the Speaker or Others: Depending on the context, “tous les trois” can include the speaker (as in “the three of us”) or refer to a group of three other people (as in “the three of them”).

    Examples:

    1. Including the Speaker: “Nous allons au cinéma, tous les trois.” (We are going to the cinema, all three of us.)
    2. Referring to Others: “Ils ont réussi le projet, tous les trois.” (They completed the project, all three of them.)

    Nuance:

    • Emphasis on the Collective: “Tous les trois” emphasizes the collective nature of an action or a state, highlighting that something involves or affects all members of the three-person group.
    • Flexibility in Use: The phrase is versatile and can be used in various contexts, from casual conversations to more formal discussions.

    Cultural Notes:

    • Group Dynamics in French Culture: French language often reflects the importance of group dynamics and relationships. “Tous les trois” is an example of how the language expresses actions and experiences shared among a small group.

    Summary:

    “Tous les trois” means “all three” or “the three of us/them” in French, used to refer to a group of three people. The phrase emphasizes collective action or experience among the group and is flexible for use in different contexts, reflecting the importance of group dynamics in the French language.

    What does “faisait quelques cachotteries” mean?

    The phrase “faisait quelques cachotteries” translates to “was making some secrets” or more idiomatically, “was being secretive” in English. It describes a person engaging in secretive or discreet behavior, often implying they are hiding something or being not entirely open.

    Usage and Context:

    • Indicating Secretive Actions: This phrase is used to suggest that someone was engaged in actions that were deliberately kept hidden or private from others.
    • Context of Gossip or Personal Relations: It’s often found in contexts where there’s discussion about personal affairs, gossip, or behavior that is not openly shared.

    Examples:

    • “Il faisait quelques cachotteries sur ses projets.” (He was being secretive about his plans.)
    • “Elle faisait quelques cachotteries concernant sa vie amoureuse.” (She was being secretive about her love life.)

    Nuance:

    • Light or Playful Tone: “Faisait quelques cachotteries” often carries a lighter or less serious connotation, potentially suggesting playful secrecy rather than serious deceit.
    • Implication of Mystery or Intrigue: The phrase can add a sense of mystery or intrigue to the person’s actions or character.

    Cultural Notes:

    • Narrative and Conversational Use: In French culture, discussing someone’s secretive actions, especially in a light or gossiping context, is a common aspect of storytelling and conversation. The phrase reflects the language’s ability to convey nuances of behavior and personality.

    Summary:

    “Faisait quelques cachotteries” means “was being secretive” in French, used to describe someone engaging in discreet or secretive actions. Often used in a lighter or less serious context, it suggests a sense of mystery or intrigue regarding the person’s actions, commonly found in discussions about personal affairs or gossip.

    What is opening up for you?

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    Take on another clip of French in real life and improve your listening comprehension skills. This clip is far slower than the average for clips on site. Can you follow along with everything? Set your level and fill in the blanks with what you hear!

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