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Transfert s01e22, Quiz 53: de ci de là

    Take on a new clip of French in real life. Loads of starts, stops, and resets as she discusses a difficult topic. Listen along as if you’re in France. Can you catch these phrases? “un petit peu”, “brutal”, “quelques bleus”, and “de ci de là”. Set your level and fill in the blanks as you…

    Learn French with a podcast snippet! This clip is is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    16 seconds, 46 words
    ' '. ' '. '.
    avait qu'elleavait quelqu'uneuheuhétaitbrutal. s'enétaitaperçus 'ci.euhperturbés qu'elleparlé.
    ellenousavaitdit qu'elleavait quelqu'uneuheuhquiétaitquiétaitbrutal. s'enétaitaperçusparce qu'elleavaitquelquesquelquescilà.euhestperturbés qu'elleenaitparlé.

    The above audio sample and transcription is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    here and there

    What’s opening up for you with this clip?

    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    Et elle nous avait pas dit qu’elle avait quelqu’un euh euh qui était pas qui était un petit peu brutal. On s’en était aperçus parce qu’elle avait quelques quelques bleus de ci de là. Et euh et on est perturbés qu’elle nous en ait pas parlé.

    And she hadn’t told us that she had someone who was a bit rough. We noticed it because she had a few bruises here and there. And we’re disturbed that she didn’t tell us.

    The above translation from Deepl

    What does “un petit peu” mean?

    “Un petit peu” translates directly to “a little bit” or “a small amount” in English. It’s a phrase used to express a small quantity, degree, or extent of something.

    Usage and Context:

    • Expressing Minimal Quantity or Degree: “Un petit peu” is commonly used to indicate that something is present or done to a small extent.
    • Modifying Statements or Requests: It often modifies statements or requests to convey moderation or slightness.

    Examples:

    1. In Conversation: “Tu peux baisser la musique un petit peu ?” (Can you lower the music a little bit?)
    2. Describing Extent: “Il comprend un petit peu l’anglais.” (He understands a little bit of English.)

    Nuance:

    • Subtlety and Moderation: “Un petit peu” suggests a level of subtlety or minimalism, often used to gently request something or to describe a slight presence or understanding.
    • Common in Polite Requests: It’s frequently used in polite requests or offers, as it softens the directness of a demand or suggestion.

    Cultural Notes:

    • Politeness and Precision in French: The use of “un petit peu” reflects the French language’s attention to politeness and precision, particularly in social interactions where moderation and understatement are valued.

    Summary:

    “Un petit peu” means “a little bit” or “a small amount” in French. It’s used to express minimal quantity, degree, or extent, commonly found in polite requests or when describing something that is present to a slight degree. The phrase embodies the French language’s nuance in conveying subtlety and moderation in both social and descriptive contexts.

    What does “brutal” mean?

    In French, “brutal” retains a meaning similar to its English counterpart, referring to something that is harsh, sudden, or lacking in gentleness or subtlety.

    Usage and Context:

    • Describing Harshness or Suddenness: “Brutal” is often used to describe actions, behaviors, or events that are harsh, abrupt, or unexpectedly direct.
    • Physical or Emotional Contexts: It can apply to both physical actions (like a violent impact) and emotional experiences (like a shocking piece of news).

    Examples:

    1. Physical Context: “Le choc a été brutal.” (The impact was brutal.)
    2. Emotional or Interpersonal Context: “Sa réaction était assez brutale.” (His reaction was quite harsh.)

    Nuance:

    • Negative Connotation: Generally, “brutal” carries a negative connotation, implying a lack of care, refinement, or consideration.
    • Intensity and Impact: It often emphasizes the strength and impact of the action or event, highlighting its forceful or jarring nature.

    Cultural Notes:

    • Usage in Various Discourses: In French, as in English, “brutal” is used in a range of contexts, from everyday conversation to political and social discourse, to describe actions or changes that are perceived as harsh or sudden.

    Summary:

    “Brutal” in French means harsh, sudden, or lacking in subtlety, similar to its English equivalent. It’s used to describe actions, behaviors, or events that are abrupt and forceful, often carrying a negative connotation. The term can apply to both physical and emotional contexts, highlighting the intense or jarring nature of what it describes.

    What does “quelques bleus” mean?

    In the context of bruises, “quelques bleus” translates to “some bruises” or “a few bruises” in English. It refers to having multiple bruises, typically as a result of minor injuries.

    Usage and Context:

    • Describing Physical Injuries: The phrase is used to describe the presence of several bruises on the body.
    • Common in Medical or Casual Settings: It can be used in both medical contexts (like a doctor’s examination) and in casual conversation when discussing minor injuries.

    Examples:

    1. After an Accident: “Après la chute, j’ai eu quelques bleus.” (After the fall, I got some bruises.)
    2. In Sports or Physical Activities: “Ce sport est assez intense; je finis souvent avec quelques bleus.” (This sport is quite intense; I often end up with a few bruises.)

    Nuance:

    • Indicating Minor Injuries: “Quelques bleus” typically implies that the bruises are not severe or life-threatening, but rather minor physical marks.
    • Informal Description: The phrase is a colloquial way to describe the common physical condition of having bruises.

    Cultural Notes:

    • Straightforward Description in French: The straightforward and somewhat informal description of physical conditions like “quelques bleus” reflects a tendency in French to describe health and body matters in a direct yet non-alarming way.

    Summary:

    “Quelques bleus” refers to “some bruises” or “a few bruises” in French, used to describe having multiple bruises, usually from minor injuries or physical activities. The phrase is typically employed in a casual, straightforward manner, indicating minor and non-severe injuries.

    What does “de ci de là” mean?

    “De ci de là” translates to “here and there” in English. It’s a French expression used to describe something that is spread out or scattered in various places, or movement in different, often random, directions.

    Usage and Context:

    • Describing Scattered Distribution: The phrase is commonly used to indicate that objects, people, or elements are dispersed over an area.
    • Indicating Non-Specific Movement or Locations: It can also refer to moving or being in various non-specific locations.

    Examples:

    1. Describing Distribution: “Il y a des fleurs plantées de ci de là dans le jardin.” (There are flowers planted here and there in the garden.)
    2. Non-Specific Location: “Pendant les vacances, nous avons voyagé de ci de là.” (During the vacation, we traveled here and there.)

    Nuance:

    • Randomness or Lack of Specificity: “De ci de là” often implies a casual, random, or unplanned arrangement or movement.
    • Poetic or Descriptive Use: The phrase has a somewhat poetic quality and is often used for descriptive, evocative language.

    Cultural Notes:

    • French Artistic Expression: This expression is reflective of the French language’s capacity for artistic and descriptive expression, capturing the essence of randomness, variety, and the beauty of scattered elements.

    Summary:

    “De ci de là” means “here and there” in French, used to describe things that are spread out or scattered across different areas, or movements in various directions. The phrase conveys a sense of randomness or non-specificity, often used poetically or descriptively to evoke the beauty or casual nature of the distribution or movement.

    What is opening up for you?

    Comment below with the words you thought you heard, where you struggled, where you surprised yourself, or what you thought about this clip. Every little bit inspires other learners, thank you for being that inspiration to others on their French fluency journey!

    Take on a new clip of French in real life. Loads of starts, stops, and resets as she discusses a difficult topic. Listen along as if you’re in France. Can you catch these phrases? “un petit peu”, “brutal”, “quelques bleus”, and “de ci de là”. Set your level and fill in the blanks as you…

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