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Transfert s01e22, Quiz 55: et là

    Improve your ear for fast spoken French with this short clip from Transfert podcast. Can you catch all 44 words in it? These phrases stood out: “je trouve”, “et là”, & “tout s’écroule”. Set your level and fill in the blanks as you listen. Improve your French listening comprehension with us!

    Learn French with a podcast snippet! This clip is is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    15 seconds, 44 words
    ,,., « ',., '., '. »
    Oh,bizarre,., « vaisdirequelquechosepersonne t'ajamais,personnedirajamais., c'était., s'écroule. »
    Oh,trouveçapeubizarre,maisbon.dit, « vaisdirequelquechosequepersonne t'ajamaisdit,quepersonnedirajamais.père, c'étaitpaspère.là,tout s'écroule. »

    The above audio sample and transcription is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    and then

    What’s opening up for you with this clip?

    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    Oh, je trouve ça un peu bizarre, mais bon. Et il me dit, « Et je vais dire quelque chose que personne ne t’a jamais dit, et que personne ne te dira jamais. Ton père, c’était pas ton père. Et là, tout s’écroule. »

    Oh, I think that’s a little weird, but okay. And he says, “And I’m going to tell you something that no one has ever told you, and no one ever will. Your father wasn’t your father. And then it all falls apart.”

    The above translation from Deepl

    What does “je trouve” mean?

    “Je trouve” translates to “I find” in English. In French, this phrase is commonly used not only in its literal sense of finding something but also to express an opinion or personal perception.

    Usage and Context:

    1. Literal Meaning: In its literal sense, “je trouve” is used when someone finds or discovers something.
      • Example: “Je trouve les clés.” (I find the keys.)
    2. Expressing Opinion or Perception: More frequently, “je trouve” is used to convey a personal viewpoint, similar to saying “I think” or “I feel” in English.
      • Example: “Je trouve que ce film est intéressant.” (I think/find that this movie is interesting.)

    Nuance:

    • Subjective Opinion: When used to express an opinion, “je trouve” implies a personal, subjective viewpoint. It’s a way of sharing one’s perspective without asserting it as an absolute fact.
    • Politeness and Tact: Using “je trouve” can be seen as a polite and tactful way to share an opinion, as it inherently acknowledges the subjectivity of the viewpoint.

    Cultural Notes:

    • Conversation Style in French: The use of “je trouve” to express opinions is a reflection of the conversational style in French, where personal viewpoints are often shared in a manner that leaves room for discussion and acknowledges their subjective nature.

    Summary:

    “Je trouve” means “I find” in French and is widely used both in its literal sense and to express personal opinions or perceptions. When used in the context of sharing viewpoints, it implies a subjective and personal perspective, similar to saying “I think” or “I feel.” This usage is indicative of the polite and tactful nature of French conversational style, emphasizing the subjectivity of personal opinions.

    What does “et là” mean?

    “Et là” is a French phrase that translates to “and then” or “and there” in English. It’s often used as a transitional phrase in storytelling or recounting events, indicating a shift to a new point or a significant moment in the narrative.

    Usage and Context:

    • Narrative Transition: “Et là” is commonly used to move the narrative forward, signaling a new development or a turning point in a story or explanation.
    • Highlighting a Specific Moment: The phrase can also emphasize a particular moment or action that is crucial or noteworthy within a sequence of events.

    Examples:

    1. In Storytelling: “Je marchais tranquillement, et là, je l’ai vu.” (I was walking calmly, and then I saw him.)
    2. Recounting Events: “Nous étions au concert, et là, la musique commence.” (We were at the concert, and then the music started.)

    Nuance:

    • Building Suspense or Emphasis: “Et là” is often used to build suspense or add emphasis in a story, marking a key moment that captures the listener’s or reader’s attention.
    • Informal and Conversational: This phrase is a staple in informal and conversational French, frequently used in spoken language.

    Cultural Notes:

    • Oral Storytelling in French: “Et là” reflects the importance of oral storytelling in French culture, where engaging and dynamic narration is highly valued. This phrase is a common tool to create engaging narratives and maintain the listener’s interest.

    Summary:

    “Et là” translates to “and then” or “and there” in French, primarily used as a transitional phrase in storytelling or recounting events. It’s often employed to signal a new development, emphasize a significant moment, or build suspense in a narrative. This phrase is particularly common in informal, conversational French, illustrating the language’s rich oral storytelling tradition.

    What does “tout s’écroule” mean?

    The phrase “tout s’écroule” translates to “everything collapses” or “everything falls apart” in English. It’s used to describe a situation where things are going wrong, often suddenly or dramatically.

    Usage and Context:

    • Metaphorical Use: While it can be used literally (for physical collapse), “tout s’écroule” is more often employed metaphorically to describe situations where plans, expectations, or circumstances deteriorate rapidly.
    • Expressing Despair or Frustration: This phrase is commonly used to express feelings of despair, frustration, or the sense that a situation has become unmanageable.

    Examples:

    1. Describing Personal Crisis: “Quand il a perdu son emploi, pour lui, tout s’écroule.” (When he lost his job, for him, everything fell apart.)
    2. Broad Situational Breakdown: “Après la nouvelle, on avait l’impression que tout s’écroule.” (After the news, it felt like everything was collapsing.)

    Nuance:

    • Intensity and Totality: The phrase often conveys a sense of totality and intensity, suggesting that not just one aspect, but the entirety of a situation is failing or deteriorating.
    • Emotional Impact: “Tout s’écroule” usually carries significant emotional weight, capturing the feeling of overwhelming distress or failure.

    Cultural Notes:

    • Dramatic Expression in French: The French language has a flair for the dramatic in expressions, and “tout s’écroule” is a good example of this. It reflects the language’s capacity to convey intense emotions and situations vividly.

    Summary:

    “Tout s’écroule” means “everything collapses” or “everything falls apart” in French, often used metaphorically to describe situations where everything seems to be going wrong, typically in a sudden or dramatic way. It’s a phrase that conveys intensity and totality of failure or breakdown, often carrying significant emotional weight, and reflects the expressive nature of the French language in conveying complex and intense situations.

    What is opening up for you?

    Comment below with the words you thought you heard, where you struggled, where you surprised yourself, or what you thought about this clip. Every little bit inspires other learners, thank you for being that inspiration to others on their French fluency journey!

    Improve your ear for fast spoken French with this short clip from Transfert podcast. Can you catch all 44 words in it? These phrases stood out: “je trouve”, “et là”, & “tout s’écroule”. Set your level and fill in the blanks as you listen. Improve your French listening comprehension with us!

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