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Transfert s01e22, quiz 6: dont

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    5 seconds, 20 words
    , ',,,.
    parleSciamma,trouve l'art,fiction,cinéma,.
    récitsdontparleCélineSciamma,trouvesouvent l'art,lafiction,aucinéma,lalittérature.

    The above audio sample and transcription is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    in which

    What’s opening up for you with this clip?

    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    Ces récits dont parle Céline Sciamma, on les trouve souvent dans l’art, dans la fiction, au cinéma, dans la littérature.

    The stories Céline Sciamma talks about are often found in art, fiction, cinema and literature.

    The above translation from Deepl

    What does “dont” mean?

    Meaning and Usage:

    • Translation: “Dont” can be translated to English as “whose,” “of which,” “from which,” or “including.”
    • Examples:
      • “Il a trois frères dont deux vivent à l’étranger.” (He has three brothers, two of whom live abroad.)
      • “Le livre dont je t’ai parlé est sur cette étagère.” (The book I told you about is on that shelf.)
      • “C’est l’homme dont la sœur est médecin.” (That’s the man whose sister is a doctor.)

    Context:

    • “Dont” is a relative pronoun that is often used to introduce a clause which provides additional information about a noun previously mentioned. It’s used when the information pertains to something involving “de” (of, from).

    Synonyms and Antonyms:

    There’s no direct synonym for “dont” as it serves a specific grammatical function. The choice between “qui,” “que,” “où,” and “dont” in French is determined by the role of the pronoun in its clause.

    Idiomatic Usage:

    • The use of “dont” in idiomatic expressions can be more flexible and might not always directly align with the typical “of which” translation. However, it’s still grounded in the idea of possession or association.
      • “avoir le don” means “to have the gift/talent.” Here, “don” and “dont” are homophones but mean different things; they are not to be confused.

    Cultural Notes:

    • Common Mistake for Learners: English speakers learning French often mix up “dont” with other relative pronouns like “qui” or “que.” This is because “whose” in English can be used for both people and things, while in French, you’d use “dont” for the equivalent of “whose” when it’s about possession.
    • Importance in Literature and Formal Writing: “Dont” is commonly used in French literature, essays, and other forms of formal writing, making it crucial for anyone wanting to engage deeply with French texts.
    • No Direct English Equivalent: The fact that “dont” can’t always be translated neatly into English with a single word (sometimes it might be “of which,” other times “whose,” etc.) underscores some of the nuanced differences between French and English grammar.

    In summary, “dont” is an indispensable relative pronoun in the French language that links clauses and provides more details about a noun. Its varied translations into English, based on context, showcase the intricacies and nuances of the French language.

    What about “dans” vs “au”?

    In French, using the prepositions “dans” and “au” holds subtle yet significant nuances. While both can be used to describe context or location, “dans la littérature” or “dans la fiction” often suggests delving into the content or thematic realm of that medium.

    Conversely, “au cinéma” can reference both the physical space of a movie theater and the broader cinematic domain. Despite these general rules, there’s a level of flexibility in their application. For instance, expressions like “dans le cinéma” or “à la littérature” might be heard, albeit less conventionally, and their meanings can shift slightly based on context.

    • “Dans le cinéma”: Typically means “in the movie theater.”
      • Example: “Je l’ai rencontré dans le cinéma, juste avant le début du film.” (I met him in the movie theater just before the film started.)
    • “À la littérature”: Isn’t standard for “in literature.” However, in some contexts, it could be construed to mean dedication or a turn towards literature.
      • Example: “Après des années dans le commerce, il s’est tourné à la littérature.” (After years in business, he turned to literature.)

    What is opening up for you?

    Comment below with the words you thought you heard, where you struggled, where you surprised yourself, or what you thought about this clip. Every little bit inspires other learners, thank you for being that inspiration to others on their French fluency journey!

    Take on a short clip today, just 5 seconds long with 20 words. Can you catch all of the 240 words per minute? Nothing too tricky for grammar or nuance in this clip. How do you find it? Let’s continue with today’s transcription quiz, keep up the habit

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