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Transfert s01e22, quiz 7: un point de

Improve your ear with this clip of French that is fast and possibly a bit poetic. Some esoteric words and phrases to hone your ear with. Do you know “comme une béance” or “nous a entravés”? Hear them and others in this 12 second phrase. Take today’s transcription quiz! And what does your ear hear…

Learn French with a podcast snippet! This clip is is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

12 seconds, 41 words
,.,.
investit,ressemblentpermettentressembler.récitsmanquentparfoisnôtres,vietuébéancedontsecretentravés.
Oninvestit,ressemblentpermettentressembler.Maisrécitsquimanquentsontaussiparfoisnôtres,pointdeviequiaététuécommebéancedontsecretaentravés.

The above audio sample and transcription is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

a point of

What do you hear? “un point de vie” or “un point de vue”? I admit point of view makes a lot more sense, but it certainly sounds like she might be saying “un point de vie”. Maybe that’s the poetry of this whole passage coming through? Or my ear hearing the wrong thing. In English both could work, right?

And then “qui a été tué” vs “qui a été tu”, it sounds like she says “tu”. It can’t be tu when that is a phrase for being killed. It’s just what is being killed – a point of life or a point of view?

I’ll admit, this clip is raising more questions than answers for me creating this quiz.

What are you hearing?

What’s opening up for you with this clip?

The snippet in English

Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

On les investit, ils nous ressemblent et nous permettent de nous ressembler. Mais les récits qui nous manquent sont aussi parfois les nôtres, un point de vie* qui a été tué* comme une béance et dont le secret nous a entravés.

We invest in them, they resemble us and allow us to resemble ourselves. But the stories we miss are also sometimes our own, a point of life that has been killed, like a void, and whose secret has shackled us.

The above translation from Deepl

What does “comme une béance” mean?

Meaning and Usage: The word “béance” in French comes from the verb “bâiller,” which means “to yawn.” “Béance” itself refers to a gaping or wide-open space, often implying something that is unsettling or difficult to bridge.

When used in the phrase “comme une béance,” it functions as a simile, indicating that something is like a vast, gaping chasm. This can be used to describe both physical gaps and more abstract or emotional divides.

Examples:

  1. “Entre leurs opinions, il y a comme une béance.” (Between their opinions, there is like a gaping chasm.)
  2. “L’entrée de la grotte ressemblait à une bouche comme une béance dans la montagne.” (The entrance of the cave looked like a gaping mouth in the mountain.)

Context: While the term “béance” can be used in various contexts, its metaphorical use (especially in the phrase “comme une béance”) is more literary and may be found in written French, such as in novels or essays, rather than in everyday casual conversation.

Synonyms:

  1. Ouverture (opening)
  2. Fente (slit or crack)
  3. Crevasse

Variations: One might encounter variations in the structure of the sentence, but “béance” is typically used to evoke the idea of something wide-open and possibly unsettling.

Idiomatic Usage: While “béance” itself is not idiomatic, when used metaphorically, it can convey a profound sense of emptiness or a significant divide between two things or concepts.

Cultural Notes:

  • The term evokes powerful imagery, often tapping into the human fear of the unknown or the vastness.
  • In literature or poetic contexts, “béance” could be used to convey a profound emotional void or a sensation of longing.
  • While “béance” can be quite vivid, it’s not among the most commonly used words in everyday French. Still, its inclusion in a text or speech would likely be understood by native speakers, especially those with a good command of the language.

What does “nous a entravés” mean?

Meaning and Usage: The verb “entraver” means “to hinder” or “to impede.” When used in the past tense, as in “nous a entravés,” it translates to “hindered us” or “impeded us.” It suggests that something acted as an obstacle or restriction for a group that includes the speaker (indicated by “nous”).

Examples:

  1. “La pluie nous a entravés dans nos plans de pique-nique.” (The rain hindered our picnic plans.)
  2. “Cette loi nous a entravés dans nos efforts pour protéger l’environnement.” (This law impeded our efforts to protect the environment.)

Context: The verb “entraver” can be used in various contexts, both formal and informal, to describe any situation where someone or something is prevented from acting freely or achieving a goal.

Synonyms:

  1. Empêcher (to prevent)
  2. Obstruer (to obstruct)
  3. Freiner (to brake or to slow down)

Variations: While “nous a entravés” is specific to a past event that affected “us” (the speaker and possibly others), one might encounter other conjugations like “il entrave” (he hinders) or “ils entravent” (they hinder) depending on the subject and tense.

Idiomatic Usage: “Entraver” can be used literally, referring to physical hindrances, or metaphorically, referring to more abstract obstacles. For instance, in older texts, “entraver” might also refer to physically tying or binding something, much like shackles would.

Cultural Notes:

  • “Entraver” isn’t the most common verb in everyday French, but it’s standard enough that most native speakers would understand it.
  • Its usage can often be found in contexts discussing challenges, barriers, or obstacles, be they in personal narratives, political discussions, or other realms.
  • In colloquial French, the phrase “Je n’entrave que dalle” is an informal way to say “I don’t understand a thing.” However, this usage is quite slangy and may not be familiar to all speakers.

What is opening up for you?

Comment below with the words you thought you heard, where you struggled, where you surprised yourself, or what you thought about this clip. Every little bit inspires other learners, thank you for being that inspiration to others on their French fluency journey!

Improve your ear with this clip of French that is fast and possibly a bit poetic. Some esoteric words and phrases to hone your ear with. Do you know “comme une béance” or “nous a entravés”? Hear them and others in this 12 second phrase. Take today’s transcription quiz! And what does your ear hear…

1 thought on “Transfert s01e22, quiz 7: un point de”

  1. I don’t think it’s “qui a été tu”, I believe it’s “qui est têtu”. I hear “point de vie” as well but honestly this sentence barely makes sense to me, it’s not straightforward at all.

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