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Transfert s01e22, Quiz 62: me faire

    Boost your French listening skills with this clip of French in real life! Can you hear everything? These words stood out for me: “me faire”, “quelque chose de bizarre” and “on me laisse”. Set your level and fill in the blanks as you listen. Watch your listening comprehension of fast spoken French improve!

    Learn French with a podcast snippet! This clip is is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    14 seconds, 41 words
    , ' '. ' '. ' ' ', ' '.
    cadeaupuissiezfaire, ' 'vérité. 'su qu'ilyavaitbizarre. 'suque j'avaispeur 'abandonnée, 'peur qu'onlaisse.
    plusbeaucadeauquepuissiezfaire, c'est m'avoirditvérité. J'aitoujourssu qu'ilyavaitquelquebizarre. J'aitoujourssuque j'avaispeur d'êtreabandonnée,que j'avaispeur qu'onlaisse.

    The above audio sample and transcription is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    to give to me (in context of gifting)

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    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    Le plus beau cadeau que vous puissiez me faire, c’est de m’avoir dit la vérité. J’ai toujours su qu’il y avait quelque chose de bizarre en moi. J’ai toujours su que j’avais peur d’être abandonnée, que j’avais peur qu’on me laisse.

    The greatest gift you could ever give me is the truth. I always knew there was something strange about me. I always knew I was afraid of being abandoned, afraid of being left alone.

    The above translation from Deepl

    What does “me faire” mean?

    “Me faire” translates to “to make me” or “to give me” in English. It’s a part of a reflexive verb form in French.

    Usage with Gifts

    In the context of gifts, “me faire” is often used to indicate that someone is giving a gift to the speaker. It emphasizes the action of giving and the recipient’s experience of receiving.

    Examples

    • “Il va me faire un cadeau pour mon anniversaire.” (He is going to give me a gift for my birthday.)
    • “Elle m’a fait un magnifique présent.” (She gave me a wonderful gift.)

    Context

    • “Me faire” in this sense is used in everyday language and can be appropriate in both formal and informal contexts.
    • It’s particularly common in conversations involving the exchange of gifts or discussing what someone has received or will receive.

    Synonyms

    • “Offrir” (to offer), used more formally.
    • “Donner” (to give), a more direct and common term for giving.

    Summary

    In the context of gifts, “me faire” translates to the act of giving a gift to the speaker. It’s commonly used in French to discuss receiving presents and can be seen in various contexts, from casual conversations to more formal discussions about gift exchanges. The phrase highlights the giver’s action and the recipient’s experience.

    What does “quelque chose de bizarre” mean?

    “Quelque chose de bizarre en moi” translates to “something strange in me” in English.

    Usage and Interpretation

    • This phrase typically refers to a feeling, thought, or characteristic within oneself that is considered odd or unusual.
    • It suggests an introspective realization or acknowledgment of something unusual or unordinary internally.
    • In French, “quelque chose de bizarre” translates to “something strange.” The use of “de” after “quelque chose” (something) is a grammatical construction that connects the noun (“quelque chose”) to an adjective (“bizarre”).
    • “Quelque chose bizarre” without “de” would be grammatically incorrect in French. The “de” is essential for linking the noun and the adjective in a way that is syntactically correct in French.

    Examples

    • “J’ai toujours senti qu’il y avait quelque chose de bizarre en moi.” (I have always felt that there was something strange in me.)
    • “Elle a découvert quelque chose de bizarre en elle après cet événement.” (She discovered something strange in herself after that event.)

    Context

    • The expression is often used in personal reflections or discussions about one’s inner self. It can appear in contexts where someone is exploring their feelings, identity, or reactions to certain situations.
    • It can be used in both formal and informal discussions, although it tends to be more personal in nature.

    Cultural and Emotional Nuance

    • The phrase can convey a range of emotions from self-awareness and curiosity to unease or concern, depending on the context.
    • In French culture, as in many others, expressions that delve into personal introspection are common in discussions about self-identity, psychology, and emotional experiences.

    Summary

    “Quelque chose de bizarre en moi” means “something strange in me.” It’s an introspective phrase used to express a realization or acknowledgement of an unusual feeling, thought, or characteristic within oneself. This expression can be found in various contexts where personal feelings, identity, and inner experiences are being explored or discussed.

    What does “on me laisse” mean?

    In the phrase “que j’avais peur qu’on me laisse,” the expression translates to “I was afraid that they would leave me” or “I was afraid of being left.” Here, “on me laisse” takes on the meaning of being left or abandoned by others.

    Interpretation in Context

    • “J’avais peur” (I was afraid) expresses the speaker’s fear or apprehension.
    • “Qu’on me laisse” refers to the fear of being left, abandoned, or forsaken by others.
    • This construction is common in French to express fears or concerns about the actions of unspecified people (“on”).

    Examples

    • “J’avais peur qu’on me laisse seul à la maison.” (I was afraid of being left alone at home.)
    • “Elle avait peur qu’on la laisse sans réponse.” (She was afraid that she would be left without an answer.)

    Context

    • This phrase would typically be used in emotional or personal discussions, where someone is expressing their fears or insecurities.
    • It’s appropriate in both formal and informal conversations, especially in contexts involving emotional sharing or psychological discussions.

    Summary

    In “que j’avais peur qu’on me laisse,” the phrase conveys a fear of being left or abandoned by others. It’s a reflection of personal anxiety or apprehension about abandonment, common in discussions about emotional experiences or insecurities. The phrase illustrates how the meaning of “on me laisse” can shift based on the context, emphasizing the flexibility of French expressions in conveying nuanced emotions.

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    Boost your French listening skills with this clip of French in real life! Can you hear everything? These words stood out for me: “me faire”, “quelque chose de bizarre” and “on me laisse”. Set your level and fill in the blanks as you listen. Watch your listening comprehension of fast spoken French improve!

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