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Transfert s01e22, Quiz 66: tout le monde

    Boost your French listening skills with us! Start at any level, take a listen and fill in as many blanks as you can. This is how you improve your ear for fast spoken French! Phrases that stuck out to me in this clip: “il s’effondre”, “tout le monde”, “autour de nous”, “a menti”, and “personne…

    Learn French with a podcast snippet! This clip is is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    26 seconds, 55 words
    , '. ',, ',,.. '. ' - '.
    Yannick, s'effondre.Parce qu'enfait,terrible, ',exception,savaitautour.mentidébut. 'jamaispartagésecretamourpère. ' grand-père 'dit.
    EtYannick, s'effondre.Parce qu'enfait,quiestterrible, c'estquemonde,sansexception,savaitautour.veutdirequemondeamentidepuisdébut.Personne n'ajamaispartagésecretamourpère. c'estque grand-père m'adit.

    The above audio sample and transcription is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

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    The snippet in English

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    Et Yannick, il s’effondre. Parce qu’en fait, ce qui est terrible, c’est que tout le monde, sans exception, le savait autour de nous. Ça veut dire que tout le monde nous a menti depuis le début. Personne n’a jamais partagé le secret par amour pour mon père. Et c’est ce que mon grand-père m’a dit.

    And Yannick collapses. Because, in fact, the terrible thing is that everyone around us, without exception, knew. That means everyone lied to us from the start. No one ever shared the secret out of love for my father. And that’s what my grandfather told me.

    The above translation from Deepl

    What does “il s’effondre” mean?

    “Il s’effondre” translates to “he collapses” or “it collapses” in English.

    Usage and Interpretation

    • The phrase is a conjugation of the reflexive verb “s’effondrer,” meaning “to collapse” or “to fall down.”
    • It can refer to a physical collapse, like a person fainting or a structure falling down, or a metaphorical collapse, such as an emotional breakdown or a failure of a system.

    Examples

    • “Il s’effondre à cause de la fatigue.” (He collapses due to fatigue.)
    • “Le bâtiment s’effondre après l’explosion.” (The building collapses after the explosion.)

    Context

    • “Il s’effondre” can be used in various contexts, including medical, emotional, structural, or metaphorical scenarios.
    • It’s appropriate in both formal and informal settings, depending on the nature of the collapse being described.

    Summary

    “Il s’effondre” means “he collapses” or “it collapses” in French, referring to either a physical or metaphorical collapse. This phrase is versatile and can be used in a range of contexts to describe a person, structure, or system falling down or breaking down.

    What does “tout le monde” mean?

    “Tout le monde” translates to “everyone” or “everybody” in English.

    Usage and Interpretation

    • “Tout le monde” is used to refer to all people in a given group, context, or general sense. It’s a collective term encompassing every individual in the mentioned or implied group.
    • Unlike English, where “everyone” is singular, “tout le monde” is treated as a plural concept in French.

    Examples

    • “Tout le monde est arrivé à la fête.” (Everyone has arrived at the party.)
    • “Tout le monde doit suivre les règles.” (Everybody must follow the rules.)

    Context

    • The phrase is versatile and used in a wide range of contexts, from casual conversations to formal speeches or writings.
    • It’s a common expression in both spoken and written French, applicable in numerous situations involving groups of people.

    Summary

    “Tout le monde” means “everyone” or “everybody” in French. It’s used to refer collectively to all individuals in a specific group or context. This phrase is a staple in both informal and formal French, used in various settings to denote inclusivity of all people.

    What does “autour de nous” mean?

    “Autour de nous” translates to “around us” in English.

    Usage and Interpretation

    • “Autour” means “around” or “about,” indicating something surrounding or encircling.
    • “De nous” refers to “us,” the people involved in the context.
    • Combined, “autour de nous” is used to describe things, people, or situations that are physically or metaphorically surrounding or involving the speaker and others.

    Examples

    • “Il y a beaucoup d’oiseaux autour de nous.” (There are many birds around us.)
    • “Nous devons être conscients de ce qui se passe autour de nous.” (We need to be aware of what is happening around us.)

    Context

    • The phrase can be used in various contexts, both literal (like describing physical surroundings) and figurative (like discussing social or environmental factors).
    • It is common in both spoken and written French and can appear in casual as well as formal communications.

    Summary

    “Autour de nous” means “around us” in French. It’s used to describe things, people, or circumstances that are in the vicinity of or involve the speaker and others. This phrase is versatile and can be applied in a range of contexts, both physical and metaphorical.

    What does “a menti” mean?

    “A menti” is the past tense form of the verb “mentir,” which means “to lie” in English. It translates to “lied.”

    Conjugation and Usage

    • “A menti” is the third person singular form in the passé composé, a common past tense in French.
    • It’s used to indicate that someone told a falsehood or was not truthful in the past.

    Examples

    • “Il a menti sur son âge.” (He lied about his age.)
    • “Elle a menti pour protéger son ami.” (She lied to protect her friend.)

    Context

    • This form can be used in various contexts, from casual conversations to formal situations, whenever referring to an act of lying in the past.
    • It’s a straightforward, direct way to state that someone was untruthful.

    Summary

    “A menti” means “lied” in French. It’s the passé composé form of “mentir,” used to describe a past action where someone was not truthful. This verb form is widely used in both informal and formal French to convey the act of lying.

    What does “personne” mean?

    • “Personne” is used in negative sentences to denote the absence of any person or to say that no one is doing something.
    • It is often accompanied by “ne” in formal written French but can be used alone in informal or spoken French.

    Examples

    • Formal: “Personne ne sait la réponse.” (Nobody knows the answer.)
    • Informal: “Personne sait la réponse.” (Nobody knows the answer.)

    Context

    • The use of “personne” as “nobody” is common in both spoken and written French.
    • It’s particularly used in contexts where negation is required, such as denying the presence or action of people.

    Distinction from “Personne” Meaning “Person”

    • It’s important to note that “personne” can also mean “person” when used in a positive context. Its meaning changes to “nobody” in negative constructions.

    Summary

    “Personne” means “nobody” or “no one” when used in negative sentences in French. It negates the presence or action of people in a given context. This usage is a fundamental aspect of negation in French, commonly seen in both formal and informal language.

    This clip is from the “Transfert” podcast

    Produced by slate.fr, “Transfert” is a unique French podcast that offers an immersive listening experience. Each episode features real-life stories narrated by the people who lived them. These personal narratives cover a wide range of human experiences and emotions, providing listeners with profound insights into the lives and minds of others. The storytelling is intimate and engaging, making it an excellent resource for French language learners to improve their listening skills while connecting with compelling, authentic content.

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    Boost your French listening skills with us! Start at any level, take a listen and fill in as many blanks as you can. This is how you improve your ear for fast spoken French! Phrases that stuck out to me in this clip: “il s’effondre”, “tout le monde”, “autour de nous”, “a menti”, and “personne…

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