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Transfert s01e22, Quiz 67: même plus

    Improve your French listening skills with this clip of French in real life! A fast pace and challenging topic. Ready to take a listen? These words and phrases stood out: “conflictuel”, “c’est de se dire”,”peut-être”, “même plus”, and “un mensonge”. What stands out for you? Start at any level, choose how much of the transcript…

    Learn French with a podcast snippet! This clip is is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    13 seconds, 48 words
    ', ' ' ', ' ' ', - ', ', ' - '.
    'peuconflictuel, ' 'parce qu'ilsprotégés, l'ontparce qu'ils 'protégée, - 'fin,etbon c'étaitmensonge, ' - j'étaisfille.
    C'estpeuconflictuel, c'estdesedire l'ontditparce qu'ilssontprotégés, l'ontditparce qu'ils m'ontprotégée, peut-être qu'àfin,etbon c'étaitmêmeplusmensonge, c'est peut-êtreque j'étaisfille.

    The above audio sample and transcription is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    no longer

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    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    C’est un petit peu conflictuel, c’est de se dire ils ne me l’ont pas dit parce qu’ils se sont protégés, ils ne me l’ont pas dit parce qu’ils m’ont protégée, et peut-être qu’à la fin, et bon c’était même plus un mensonge, c’est peut-être que j’étais sa fille.

    It’s a little bit conflicting, it’s saying to yourself they didn’t tell me because they were protecting themselves, they didn’t tell me because they were protecting me, and maybe in the end, and well it wasn’t even a lie anymore, maybe I was his daughter.

    The above translation from Deepl

    What does “conflictuel” mean?

    “Conflictuel” directly translates to “conflictual” in English. However, a more commonly used term is “conflicting.”

    Usage

    • The adjective “conflictuel” describes situations, relationships, or behaviors characterized by conflict, disagreement, or tension.
    • It specifically denotes the presence or potential for opposition, strife, or incompatibility.

    Examples

    • “Une relation conflictuelle” translates as “a conflicting relationship,” indicating a relationship filled with disagreements or tension.
    • “Des opinions conflictuelles” means “conflicting opinions,” where opinions are in direct opposition or disagreement with each other.

    Context

    • “Conflictuel” is used in various contexts, including interpersonal dynamics, professional settings, and social or political discussions.
    • It is particularly relevant in scenarios where the main aspect or issue is the conflict or tension present.

    Summary

    “Conflictuel” in French translates most accurately to “conflicting” in English. It’s used to describe situations, relationships, or ideas that are marked by conflict, disagreement, or tension. The term is applicable in contexts where opposition or discord is a significant characteristic.

    What does “c’est de se dire” mean?

    “C’est de se dire” translates roughly to “it’s to tell oneself” in English.

    Usage and Interpretation

    • This phrase is used to introduce a thought or realization that one might come to internally. It’s about acknowledging or admitting something to oneself.
    • It often precedes a reflexive or introspective statement.

    Examples

    • “C’est de se dire que tout ira bien qui m’aide.” (Telling myself that everything will be fine is what helps me.)
    • “La partie la plus difficile, c’est de se dire qu’on a tort.” (The hardest part is admitting to oneself that one is wrong.)

    Context

    • “C’est de se dire” is typically used in emotional, psychological, or reflective contexts. It’s a phrase that introduces a personal acknowledgment or a self-directed realization.
    • It can appear in both casual and formal discussions, especially those involving introspection or self-reflection.

    Summary

    “C’est de se dire” means “it’s to tell oneself” in French. It’s used to introduce an internal acknowledgment or realization, often as part of a reflective or introspective process. This phrase is relevant in various contexts where internal dialogue or self-admission is discussed.

    What does “peut-être” mean?

    “Peut-être” translates to “maybe” or “perhaps” in English.

    Usage and Interpretation

    • The phrase is used to express uncertainty or possibility. It indicates that something might happen or be true, but there is no certainty.
    • It’s often used to suggest a tentative idea or to introduce a conjecture.

    Examples

    • “Peut-être qu’il viendra demain.” (Maybe he will come tomorrow.)
    • “Peut-être que tu as raison.” (Perhaps you are right.)

    Context

    • “Peut-être” is versatile and can be used in a variety of contexts, including casual conversations and more formal discussions. It’s suitable wherever there is a need to express doubt or possibility.
    • It’s a common expression in both spoken and written French.

    Summary

    “Peut-être” means “maybe” or “perhaps” in French. It’s used to convey uncertainty or the possibility of something happening. This phrase is adaptable and widely used in different contexts to express tentative ideas or uncertainty.

    What does “même plus” mean?

    “Même plus” translates to “not even anymore” or “no longer” in English.

    Usage and Interpretation

    • The phrase is often used to indicate that something that used to happen no longer occurs.
    • It can emphasize the cessation or end of an action, situation, or condition.

    Examples

    • “Je ne le vois même plus.” (I don’t even see him anymore.)
    • “Elle ne travaille même plus ici.” (She doesn’t even work here anymore.)

    Context

    • “Même plus” is typically used in negative sentences to stress the discontinuation of an event or action.
    • It’s suitable for both informal and formal contexts and is a common way to express change or end in various situations.

    Summary

    “Même plus” means “not even anymore” or “no longer” in French. It’s used to highlight that something which used to happen has stopped occurring. The phrase is versatile and can be applied in a range of contexts to indicate the end or cessation of actions, conditions, or situations.

    What does “un mensonge” mean?

    “Un mensonge” translates to “a lie” in English.

    Usage and Interpretation

    • The word refers to a false statement made with the intention to deceive. It’s used to describe something that is not true or not in accordance with the truth.
    • In French, “un mensonge” is a noun and is used to specifically refer to the act or instance of lying.

    Examples

    • “Il a dit un mensonge pour éviter les ennuis.” (He told a lie to avoid trouble.)
    • “Dévoiler un mensonge peut parfois être difficile.” (Unveiling a lie can sometimes be difficult.)

    Context

    • “Un mensonge” can be used in various contexts, from everyday casual conversations to more serious discussions about ethics and morality.
    • It’s appropriate in any situation where the topic of truthfulness, honesty, or deception is being discussed.

    Summary

    “Un mensonge” means “a lie” in French. It’s used to describe a false statement or an act of deception. The term is applicable in multiple contexts, encompassing anything from small, harmless fibs to significant, impactful falsehoods.

    This clip is from the “Transfert” podcast

    Produced by slate.fr, “Transfert” is a unique French podcast that offers an immersive listening experience. Each episode features real-life stories narrated by the people who lived them. These personal narratives cover a wide range of human experiences and emotions, providing listeners with profound insights into the lives and minds of others. The storytelling is intimate and engaging, making it an excellent resource for French language learners to improve their listening skills while connecting with compelling, authentic content.

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    Improve your French listening skills with this clip of French in real life! A fast pace and challenging topic. Ready to take a listen? These words and phrases stood out: “conflictuel”, “c’est de se dire”,”peut-être”, “même plus”, and “un mensonge”. What stands out for you? Start at any level, choose how much of the transcript…

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