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Manger ep. 1, Quiz 50: on résume

    Do you know “on résume”? I’m sure you can guess it. Can you hear and understand it in this clip? Start at any level and fill in the blanks of our transcription quiz. Perfect for anyone from DALF prep to A1 beginners!

    This clip is from Manger Episode 1. Listen and fill in what you hear below. Read more and find a translation below. Listen to the full episode here.

    18 seconds, 57 words

    This audio sample and transcription is from Manger ep. 1. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode

    ,,, '.. ',, '.,.
    résume,Kelloggsarrive,développe,en s'adressant.céréalesdeviennenthabitudealimentaire. 'Nora,, 'échapper.,victimesmarketing.
    Doncsionrésume,Kelloggsarrivedansannées,sedéveloppedansannéesdansannées,en s'adressantdirectementenfants.céréalesdeviennenthabitudealimentaire. puisqu'onestdansannéesNora,,on n'apaspuyéchapper.Etouais,victimesdumarketing.

    we summarize

    Do you add an accent when you write the English word resume? I know it comes from this verb. But when I write the word resume in English I do not use an accent. I like when words are shared across languages.

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    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    Donc si on résume, Kelloggs arrive dans les années 60 en France, se développe dans les années 70 et dans les années 80, en s’adressant directement aux enfants. Les céréales deviennent une habitude alimentaire. Et puisqu’on est né dans les années 80 Nora, toi et moi, on n’a pas pu y échapper. Et ouais, victimes du marketing.

    So if we summarize, Kelloggs arrives in the 60’s in France, develops in the 70’s and in the 80’s, by addressing directly the children. Cereals become a food habit. And since we were born in the 80’s Nora, you and I couldn’t escape it. And yeah, victims of marketing.

    The above translation from Deepl. Source

    What does “on résume” mean?

    “On résume” is a French phrase that translates to “to summarize” or “we summarize” in English. It is composed of the pronoun “on” (which is equivalent to “we” or “one”) and the verb “résumer” (to summarize).

    The phrase “on résume” refers to the act of condensing or presenting the main points or key information of a topic or discussion in a concise manner. It indicates the process of providing a brief overview or recapitulation of a longer or more detailed content.

    Here are a few examples to illustrate the usage of “on résume”:

    1. “Après une longue présentation, on résume les points importants en quelques phrases.” (After a long presentation, we summarize the key points in a few sentences.)
    2. “On résume le livre en quelques paragraphes pour donner un aperçu global.” (We summarize the book in a few paragraphs to provide an overall overview.)
    3. “Avant de conclure, on résume les principaux arguments avancés dans le débat.” (Before concluding, we summarize the main arguments presented in the debate.)

    An antonym that helps illustrate the meaning of “on résume” is “on détaille” (we detail). While “on résume” involves providing a concise overview, “on détaille” involves going into more depth and providing a more thorough and comprehensive explanation or analysis.

    What does “s’adressant directement” mean?

    “S’adressant directement” is a French phrase that can be translated as “addressing directly” in English. It is a verbal construction consisting of the reflexive verb “s’adresser” (to address oneself) and the adverb “directement” (directly).

    When used in a sentence, “s’adressant directement” describes an action of directly speaking or communicating with someone or a specific audience. It implies a direct approach or engagement without intermediaries or filters.

    Here are a few examples to illustrate the usage of “s’adressant directement”:

    1. “Le président s’adressant directement aux citoyens lors de son discours.” (The president addressing directly the citizens during his speech.)
    2. “Dans sa lettre, l’auteur s’adressant directement à ses lecteurs.” (In his letter, the author addressing directly his readers.)
    3. “Le professeur s’adressant directement à ses étudiants pour donner des instructions.” (The professor addressing directly his students to give instructions.)

    An antonym that helps illustrate the meaning of “s’adressant directement” is “s’adressant indirectement” (addressing indirectly). While “s’adressant directement” suggests a direct form of communication, “s’adressant indirectement” implies a more subtle or indirect way of conveying a message or engaging with the audience.

    Interesting facts about the phrase or its usage include its relevance in various contexts, such as public speaking, written communication, or interpersonal interactions. “S’adressant directement” emphasizes a direct and personal connection between the speaker and the audience, highlighting the intention to establish a direct line of communication. This phrase can be particularly effective in capturing attention, conveying sincerity, and fostering a sense of closeness or intimacy between the speaker and the addressed individuals.

    What does “Et puisque” mean?

    “Et puisque” is a French phrase that translates to “and since” or “since” in English. It is a conjunction that introduces a cause or reason for a subsequent statement. The phrase is composed of the conjunction “et” (and) and the conjunction “puisque” (since).

    “Et puisque” indicates a logical connection between two statements, with the second statement being a consequence or result of the first. It establishes a cause-and-effect relationship, where the first statement serves as the reason or justification for the second statement.

    Here are a few examples to illustrate the usage of “et puisque”:

    1. “J’ai étudié toute la nuit, et puisque j’étais bien préparé, j’ai réussi mon examen.” (I studied all night, and since I was well-prepared, I passed my exam.)
    2. “Nous avons économisé beaucoup d’argent, et puisque nous avions assez, nous avons pu partir en vacances.” (We saved a lot of money, and since we had enough, we were able to go on vacation.)
    3. “Il pleut dehors, et puisque je n’ai pas de parapluie, je vais rester à la maison.” (It’s raining outside, and since I don’t have an umbrella, I’m going to stay home.)

    An antonym that can help illustrate the meaning of “et puisque” is “mais” (but). While “et puisque” introduces a cause-and-effect relationship, “mais” introduces a contrasting or opposing idea.

    Interesting facts about the phrase or its usage include its common occurrence in both spoken and written French. “Et puisque” provides a clear and concise way to express the logical connection between two statements, particularly when explaining a reason or justification for an action or outcome. It helps establish a coherent flow of ideas and strengthens the coherence of the overall message.

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    Do you know “on résume”? I’m sure you can guess it. Can you hear and understand it in this clip? Start at any level and fill in the blanks of our transcription quiz. Perfect for anyone from DALF prep to A1 beginners!

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