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Passarelles ep. 1, Quiz 69: un tournant dans la vie

Ever thought of birthdays as existential crossroads? Learn the meaning behind phrases like ‘peut être,’ ‘parfois,’ and ‘un tournant dans la vie’ in this 29-word clip from ‘Passerelles.’ What’s opening up for you in this clip? Dive in, hear these phrases in context, and fill in the blanks as we explore the depth behind celebrations…

This clip is from Passerelles Episode 1. Listen and fill in what you hear below. Read more and find a translation below. Listen to the full episode here.

13 seconds, 29 words

This audio sample and transcription is from Passerelles ep. 1. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode

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'anniversairesourcequestionnementsexistentiels, 'marqueparfoistournant, ' 'occasioncorrigerrééquilibrercrises 'traverse.
'anniversairepeutsourcequestionnementsexistentiels, 'ilmarqueparfoistournantvie, 'est 'occasioncorrigerrééquilibrercrises 'ontraverse.

a turning point in life

What’s opening up for you with this clip?

The snippet in English

Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

Si l’anniversaire peut être la source de questionnements existentiels, s’il marque parfois un tournant dans la vie, c’est aussi l’occasion de corriger et de rééquilibrer les crises qu’on traverse.

While birthdays can be a source of existential questioning, and sometimes mark a turning point in one’s life, they are also an opportunity to correct and rebalance the crises we’re going through.

The above translation from Deepl. Source

What does “peut être” mean?

“Peut être” is a French phrase that translates to “may be” or “can be” in English. It is used to indicate a possibility or a likelihood but not a certainty. It is often found in statements or questions where the speaker is uncertain about the outcome or the nature of something.

Examples:

  • “Ce livre peut être intéressant.” (This book may be interesting.)
  • “Il peut être tard pour changer de métier.” (It may be too late to change careers.)

When to Use:

Use “peut être” when you want to indicate that something is a possibility, but you’re not 100% sure. It is appropriate in both formal and informal contexts.

Antonyms:

  • “Ne peut pas être” (cannot be)
  • “Est définitivement” (is definitely)

In Summary:

The phrase “peut être” is a straightforward way to express the possibility or probability of something happening or being a certain way. It adds a level of uncertainty to statements or questions, making it useful for situations where things aren’t clear-cut.

What does “parfois” mean?

The word “parfois” translates to “sometimes” in English. It indicates that an event or situation occurs occasionally, not regularly or constantly. “Parfois” is often used to describe habits, occurrences, or states that are not consistent but happen from time to time.

Examples:

  • “Je vais parfois au cinéma le week-end.” (I sometimes go to the movies on weekends.)
  • “Il pleut parfois en été.” (It sometimes rains in the summer.)

When to Use:

Use “parfois” when you want to convey that something happens occasionally, but not all the time. It can be used in both formal and informal contexts.

When Not to Use/Antonyms:

If an event is continuous or constant, “parfois” is not the appropriate word to use. In such cases, words like “toujours” (always) or “constamment” (constantly) would be more suitable.

Related Phrases:

  • “De temps en temps” (from time to time)
  • “Occasionnellement” (occasionally)

In Summary:

“Parfois” is a versatile word used to describe something that happens occasionally. It adds a nuance of irregularity or randomness to a statement, and is useful in a wide variety of situations to convey that something is not constant but occurs from time to time.

What does “un tournant dans la vie” mean?

The phrase “un tournant dans la vie” translates to “a turning point in life” in English. It refers to a significant event or decision that drastically changes the course of one’s life. This could be anything from a career change to getting married or having a transformative experience.

Examples:

  • “L’obtention de ce travail a été un tournant dans ma vie.” (Getting this job was a turning point in my life.)
  • “Sa rencontre avec elle a été un tournant dans sa vie.” (Meeting her was a turning point in his life.)

When to Use:

The phrase is often used when discussing important life events or decisions that have a significant impact on one’s life trajectory. It can be used in both formal and informal contexts.

When Not to Use/Antonyms:

If the event or decision does not have a substantial impact, it would not be considered “un tournant dans la vie.” For less significant changes, you might use phrases like “une petite étape” (a small step) or “un petit changement” (a minor change).

Related Phrases:

  • “Un moment clé” (a key moment)
  • “Une étape importante” (an important milestone)

In Summary:

“Un tournant dans la vie” refers to a pivotal moment or decision that substantially changes the direction of one’s life. It is a weighty term often used to mark the significance of life-altering events or choices.

What is opening up for you?

Comment below with the words you thought you heard, where you struggled, where you surprised yourself, or what you thought about this clip. Every little bit inspires other learners, thank you for being that inspiration to others on their French fluency journey!

Ever thought of birthdays as existential crossroads? Learn the meaning behind phrases like ‘peut être,’ ‘parfois,’ and ‘un tournant dans la vie’ in this 29-word clip from ‘Passerelles.’ What’s opening up for you in this clip? Dive in, hear these phrases in context, and fill in the blanks as we explore the depth behind celebrations…

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