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Transfert s01e22, quiz 10: peut-être que

    Take on French in real life, with the starts, stops, and colloquialisms you can expect from NOT your teacher’s French. Can you catch phrases like: “jusqu’à ce que”, “je ne me suis jamais dit”, “peut-être que”, & “Jamais !” ? Hear them all and more in this fast clip from Transfert.

    Learn French with a podcast snippet! This clip is is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    9 seconds, 28 words
    ' ', « , - ' - ', - '... » !
    'que j'apprennevérité,dit « Ah, -que ' -que 'famille, - 'quelque... » !
    'que j'apprennevérité,jamaisdit « Ah, peut-êtreque c'est peut-êtreque c'estfamille, peut-êtreque c'estquelque... » Jamais !

    The above audio sample and transcription is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    maybe that

    What’s opening up for you with this clip?

    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    Mais jusqu’à ce que j’apprenne la vérité, je ne me suis jamais dit « Ah, peut-être que c’est dans ma famille, peut-être que c’est quelque… » Jamais !

    But until I learned the truth, I never said to myself “Ah, maybe it’s in my family, maybe it’s some…” Never!

    The above translation from Deepl

    What does “jusqu’à ce que” mean?

    Meaning and Usage:

    “Jusqu’à ce que” is a French conjunction that translates to “until” in English. It introduces a dependent clause and indicates a point in time up to which an action or situation continues.

    ce que” or no “ce que”

    “Jusqu’à” is followed by a noun, pronoun, or specific time point:

    • “J’attendrai jusqu’à minuit.” (I will wait until midnight.)
    • “Il a couru jusqu’à la maison.” (He ran up to the house.)
    • “Je suis disponible jusqu’à vendredi.” (I’m available until Friday.)

    “Jusqu’à ce que” is followed by a clause with a subject and a verb:

    • “Je vais attendre jusqu’à ce que tu arrives.” (I will wait until you arrive.)
    • “Elle étudie jusqu’à ce qu’elle comprenne le sujet.” (She studies until she understands the subject.)

    While both convey the idea of “up to a point in time,” the structure that follows determines which to use.

    Examples:

    1. “Il faut attendre jusqu’à ce que la lumière soit verte.” (You must wait until the light is green.)
    2. “Je travaillerai jusqu’à ce que le travail soit terminé.” (I will work until the job is done.)

    Context:

    The phrase “jusqu’à ce que” is commonly used in both spoken and written French. It can appear in various contexts such as giving instructions, making promises, or describing situations that continue up to a certain point.

    Synonyms and Antonyms:

    Synonyms:

    • “Avant que” (before) – though it conveys a different temporal relation, it’s similarly used to connect clauses.
    • “Tant que” (as long as) – can sometimes overlap in meaning depending on the context.

    Antonyms:

    • “Depuis que” (since) – marks the starting point of an action rather than its culmination or endpoint.

    Variations:

    • “Jusqu’à” (until) – can be used with time points, like “jusqu’à demain” (until tomorrow).
    • “Jusqu’au” (until the) – used before a masculine noun, like “jusqu’au matin” (until the morning).

    Idiomatic Usage:

    While “jusqu’à ce que” is not idiomatic in and of itself, it often forms part of idiomatic expressions or is used in figurative ways. Example: “Il ne s’arrêtera pas jusqu’à ce que tu lui dises la vérité.” (He won’t stop until you tell him the truth.)

    Cultural Notes:

    “Jusqu’à ce que” is a fundamental conjunction in the French language, and as such, it features heavily in literature, songs, movies, and daily conversations. Its usage helps to convey the idea of persistence, continuation, or anticipation of a future event, making it a versatile tool in storytelling. In French culture, where the journey or process is often as valued as the destination or outcome, this conjunction plays a crucial role in describing the nuances of such journeys.

    What does “je ne me suis jamais dit” mean?

    Meaning and Usage:

    “Je ne me suis jamais dit” translates to “I never told myself” or “I never thought” in English. It is a reflexive expression, which means that the action refers back to the subject, emphasizing the internal realization or conversation one has with oneself.

    Examples:

    • “Je ne me suis jamais dit que ce serait facile.” (I never told myself it would be easy.)
    • “Je ne me suis jamais dit qu’elle pourrait me trahir.” (I never thought she could betray me.)

    Context:

    This expression can be used in both informal and formal contexts. It’s a way to communicate an internal thought or belief you’ve held or never considered.

    Synonyms:

    • “Je n’ai jamais pensé” (I never thought)
    • “Il ne m’est jamais venu à l’esprit que” (It never came to my mind that)

    Idiomatic Usage:

    While the phrase itself is somewhat idiomatic in nature, as it refers to an internal dialogue, there aren’t specific idioms that are directly built upon it. However, it’s worth noting that many reflexive verbs in French convey an internal or personal action, adding depth to the language.

    Cultural Notes:

    Internal dialogues and self-reflection are universal human experiences, but the way languages handle them varies. French, with its extensive use of reflexive verbs, offers a rich palette for expressing various shades of self-referential actions or thoughts. “Je ne me suis jamais dit” is just one of many such expressions that reflect the nuanced ways in which French speakers can talk about their inner world. This might be comparable to English phrases like “I never said to myself” or “It never crossed my mind,” which also communicate internal reflections.

    What does “peut-être que” mean?

    Meaning and Usage:

    “Peut-être que” translates to “maybe that” or “perhaps that” in English. It is used to introduce a possibility or speculation about a situation.

    Examples:

    • “Peut-être que Paul viendra à la fête demain.” (Maybe Paul will come to the party tomorrow.)
    • “Peut-être qu’elle a oublié son rendez-vous.” (Perhaps she forgot her appointment.)

    On the other hand, “peut-être” alone can also mean “maybe” or “perhaps” and can be used in a similar context but is often positioned differently in the sentence.

    Examples:

    • “Paul viendra peut-être à la fête demain.” (Paul might come to the party tomorrow.)
    • “Elle a peut-être oublié son rendez-vous.” (She might have forgotten her appointment.)

    Context:

    Both “peut-être que” and “peut-être” can be used in both informal and formal contexts. They are versatile expressions used to indicate uncertainty or speculation.

    Synonyms:

    • “Il se pourrait que” (It’s possible that)
    • “Il est possible que” (It is possible that)

    Idiomatic Usage:

    While “peut-être” and “peut-être que” are not idiomatic per se, they’re essential for expressing doubt or possibility in French. Knowing where and how to use them can help a non-native speaker sound more fluent.

    Cultural Notes:

    The concept of uncertainty is universal, but different cultures and languages have various ways of expressing it. In French, “peut-être” and “peut-être que” are the go-to phrases for such expressions. While both can be translated to “maybe” or “perhaps” in English, their placement in the sentence can vary. Understanding the nuance between the two and knowing when to use one over the other can greatly enhance one’s fluency in French.

    What does “Jamais !” mean?

    Meaning and Usage:

    “Jamais !” directly translates to “Never!” in English. It is a strong, emphatic expression used to denote absolute refusal or to state that something has never occurred.

    Examples:

    • “Tu penses qu’il trahirait ses amis ? Jamais !” (Do you think he would betray his friends? Never!)
    • “J’ai vu cette personne avant ? Jamais !” (Have I seen this person before? Never!)

    Context:

    “Jamais !” can be used in both informal and formal contexts, although the emphatic nature of the standalone exclamation might be more commonly encountered in oral, informal conversations. It conveys strong emotion or conviction.

    Synonyms:

    • “Pas du tout !” (Not at all!)
    • “En aucun cas !” (Under no circumstances!)

    Idiomatic Usage:

    “Jamais” in other contexts can have a slightly different meaning. For instance:

    • “Ne… jamais” means “never” in negative sentences: “Il ne vient jamais ici.” (He never comes here.)
    • In questions, it can imply “ever”: “As-tu jamais visité la France ?” (Have you ever visited France?)

    Cultural Notes:

    The word “jamais” and especially the emphatic “Jamais!” is a clear and strong statement in the French language. Just as in English, tone and context play significant roles. While “Never!” can be a dramatic proclamation in English, the same can be said for “Jamais!” in French. Using it appropriately can convey strong sentiments, making conversations more animated and expressive. However, as with any emphatic statement, it’s essential to use it judiciously to ensure the intended meaning is clear and to avoid potential misunderstandings.

    What is opening up for you?

    Comment below with the words you thought you heard, where you struggled, where you surprised yourself, or what you thought about this clip. Every little bit inspires other learners, thank you for being that inspiration to others on their French fluency journey!

    Take on French in real life, with the starts, stops, and colloquialisms you can expect from NOT your teacher’s French. Can you catch phrases like: “jusqu’à ce que”, “je ne me suis jamais dit”, “peut-être que”, & “Jamais !” ? Hear them all and more in this fast clip from Transfert.

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