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Transfert s01e22, Quiz 17: sur la route

    FacebookTweetPinLinkedIn Learn French with a podcast snippet! This clip is is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here. The above audio sample and transcription is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here. on the road What’s opening up for… Read…

    Learn French with a podcast snippet! This clip is is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    19 seconds, 58 words
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    Euh 'souvent,parce qu'ilroute,gérait, ' ' l'autorité. '.très avant-garde,portaitpantalonsnanas n'enportaient époque-là.Euhfumait,conduisait. -,faisaient.
    Euhpapa n'étaitpassouvent,parce qu'ilétaitroute,doncmamangéraittoutmaison, c'étaitla c'était l'autorité. C'étaitmeilleure.étaittrès avant-garde,portaitpantalonsnanas n'enportaientpas époque-là.Euhfumait,conduisait. belles-sœurs,faisaientpasça.

    The above audio sample and transcription is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    on the road

    What’s opening up for you with this clip?

    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    Euh … Mon papa n’était pas là souvent, parce qu’il était sur la route, donc maman gérait tout à la maison, c’était la … c’était l’autorité. C’était ma meilleure amie. Elle était très avant-garde, elle portait des pantalons quand les nanas n’en portaient pas à cette époque-là. Euh… Elle fumait, elle conduisait. Ses belles-sœurs, elles faisaient pas ça.

    My dad wasn’t around much, because he was on the road, so Mom managed everything at home, she was the authority. She was my best friend. She was very avant-garde, she wore pants when chicks didn’t in those days. She smoked, she drove her sisters-in-law, she didn’t do that.

    The above translation from Deepl

    What does “sur la route” mean?

    “Sur la route” is a French phrase that translates to “on the road” in English. It can be used in various contexts to convey different meanings, depending on how it’s used. Here’s a breakdown:

    Literal Meaning:

    • “Sur”: On
    • “La route”: The road
    • Together, it literally means “on the road.”

    Common Usages:

    1. Physical Travel: Used to describe someone physically traveling on a road.
      • “Nous sommes sur la route pour Paris.” (We are on the road to Paris.)
      • It can describe a journey, whether long or short.
    2. Journey or Process: Describing a metaphorical journey or process.
      • “Il est sur la route du succès.” (He is on the path to success.)
      • It can imply progress or movement in a certain direction in life or in a project.
    3. In a Song or Book Title: “Sur la route” is a famous song by the French singer Zaz, and it’s also the title of the French translation of Jack Kerouac’s novel “On the Road.”
      • In these contexts, it can capture themes of travel, adventure, and searching for meaning.
    4. Daily Commute: Describing someone’s daily travel to work or school.
      • “Je suis sur la route tous les jours à 7 heures.” (I am on the road every day at 7 a.m.)
      • It can refer to the routine of daily life.

    In Summary:

    “Sur la route” is a versatile phrase in French that can describe physical travel on a road, metaphorical journeys in life, the daily commute, or it can evoke themes of adventure and freedom. It’s a phrase that’s deeply embedded in both everyday language and cultural expressions.

    What does “gérait tout à la maison” mean?

    The phrase “gérait tout à la maison” translates to “managed everything at home” or “took care of everything at home” in English. Here’s a detailed breakdown:

    Literal Translation:

    • “Gérait”: Managed or handled. This comes from the verb “gérer,” which means to manage or handle.
    • “Tout”: Everything.
    • “À la maison”: At home.
    • Put together, it literally translates to “managed everything at home.”

    Usage and Context:

    1. Describing Domestic Responsibilities: This phrase is often used to describe someone who takes on the majority, if not all, of the household chores, responsibilities, and decision-making.
      • “Ma mère gérait tout à la maison pendant que mon père travaillait.” (My mother managed everything at home while my father was at work.)
    2. Highlighting the Workload: It underscores the significant workload and responsibility shouldered by the person in question, emphasizing their role in maintaining the household.
      • “Il gérait tout à la maison, de la cuisine au ménage en passant par les devoirs des enfants.” (He managed everything at home, from cooking and cleaning to helping the children with their homework.)

    In Summary:

    “Gérait tout à la maison” is a French phrase used to describe someone who manages all household responsibilities. While it can reflect traditional gender roles, its contemporary usage might also highlight changing societal norms regarding domestic responsibilities. The phrase underscores the significant workload carried by the individual it describes.

    What does “les nanas” mean?

    “Les nanas” is a French colloquial term that is often used to refer to girls or women. Here’s a detailed breakdown:

    Literal and Colloquial Meaning:

    • Literal Translation: The literal translation of “nana” is girl or woman.
    • Colloquial Usage: In colloquial French, “les nanas” is used informally to talk about girls or a group of women, similar to saying “gals” or “chicks” in English.

    Usage and Context:

    1. Informal and Friendly: It is a friendly and informal term.
      • “On va sortir avec les nanas ce soir.” (We are going out with the girls tonight.)
    2. Can Be Pejorative: Depending on the tone and context, it can sometimes be pejorative or condescending.
      • “Elles sont toujours comme ça, les nanas.” (They are always like that, those girls.)
    3. Age-Neutral: The term can refer to women of all ages, though it is more commonly used for younger women.

    Cultural and Societal Implications:

    • Informality: “Les nanas” is casual and should be used in informal settings. It would be out of place in formal or professional discourse.
    • Familiarity: It implies a certain level of familiarity or camaraderie among the speakers.

    Connotations:

    • The term is generally positive or neutral, but as with many colloquial terms, its connotations can vary widely based on context, tone, and the relationship between the speaker and the subjects.

    Examples:

    • “Les nanas de ma classe sont vraiment sympas.” (The girls in my class are really nice.)
    • “On a passé une super soirée entre nanas.” (We had a great girls’ night out.)

    In Summary:

    “Les nanas” is a colloquial French term used to refer to girls or women. It is informal and friendly, though it can sometimes carry a pejorative or condescending tone depending on the context. The term is age-neutral and implies a level of familiarity among the speakers. It is best used in informal settings and among friends.

    What is opening up for you?

    Comment below with the words you thought you heard, where you struggled, where you surprised yourself, or what you thought about this clip. Every little bit inspires other learners, thank you for being that inspiration to others on their French fluency journey!

    FacebookTweetPinLinkedIn Learn French with a podcast snippet! This clip is is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here. The above audio sample and transcription is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here. on the road What’s opening up for… Read…

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