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Transfert s01e22, Quiz 18: assez imposant

Improve your ear with this clip from Transfert. Diveinto words like “gros nounours”, “assez imposant”, and “faire du mal”. Can you hear them all in this clip? Use our fill in the blanks quiz to improve your ear for fast spoken French!

Learn French with a podcast snippet! This clip is is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

16 seconds, 49 words
, ',, ', ' ' ' ', ' '.
, 'euhnounours,assezimposant, 'euhchatonsbrasonavait,savait ' n'allaitpas qu'il n'allaittoucher, ' 'mal.
père, c'étaiteuhgrosgrosnounours,étaitassezimposant,mais j'aiimageluiaveceuhchatonsdansbrasonavait,savait qu'il n'allaitpas qu'il n'allaitpastoucher, qu'il n'allaitpasfairemal.

The above audio sample and transcription is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

quite imposing

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The snippet in English

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Mon père, c’était (euh le le gros) le gros nounours, il était assez imposant, mais j’ai une image de lui avec euh des petits chatons dans ses bras où, (on avait,) on savait (qu’il n’allait pas les) qu’il n’allait pas les toucher, qu’il n’allait pas leur faire du mal.

My father was the big teddy bear, he was quite imposing, but I have a picture of him with little kittens in his arms where you knew he wasn’t going to touch them, that he wasn’t going to hurt them.

The above translation from Deepl

What does “gros nounours” mean?

“Gros nounours” is a French phrase that translates to “big teddy bear” in English. Here’s a more detailed breakdown:

Literal and Colloquial Meaning:

  • Literal Translation: “Gros” means “big” or “large,” and “nounours” is a term for “teddy bear.”
  • Colloquial Usage: The phrase can refer to an actual large teddy bear, or it can be used metaphorically to describe a person, typically a man, who is large, gentle, and cuddly in nature.

Usage and Context:

  1. Describing a Person: When used to describe a person, “gros nounours” conveys a sense of warmth, kindness, and approachability.
    • “Mon oncle est un gros nounours, il est toujours prêt à donner des câlins.” (My uncle is a big teddy bear; he is always ready to give hugs.)
  2. Describing an Object: When referring to an actual teddy bear or a plush toy, it emphasizes the size and cuddliness of the toy.
    • “Pour son anniversaire, elle a reçu un gros nounours.” (For her birthday, she received a big teddy bear.)

Cultural and Societal Implications:

  • Affectionate Term: “Gros nounours” is often used affectionately and implies a certain endearment towards the person being described.
  • Gender and Appearance: While it can be used to describe people of any gender, it is more commonly used for men, often those with a larger build.

Connotations:

  • The term has positive connotations, emphasizing kindness, warmth, and a sense of safety and comfort.

Examples:

  • “Ne t’inquiète pas, il a l’air intimidant, mais c’est un gros nounours.” (Don’t worry, he looks intimidating, but he’s a big teddy bear.)
  • “Elle a une collection impressionnante de gros nounours.” (She has an impressive collection of big teddy bears.)

In Summary:

“Gros nounours” literally means “big teddy bear” in French and can be used both literally to describe a large plush toy and metaphorically to describe a person with a large, gentle, and kind nature. The term is affectionate and has positive connotations, though it is informal and typically used in familiar settings.

What does “assez imposant” mean?

“Assez imposant” is a French phrase that can be translated to “quite imposing” or “fairly imposing” in English. Below is a detailed explanation:

Literal and Colloquial Meaning:

  • Literal Translation: “Assez” means “quite” or “fairly,” and “imposant” means “imposing” or “impressive.”
  • Colloquial Usage: The phrase is used to describe something or someone that has a significant presence, is impressive in size, stature, or character, or commands attention.

Usage and Context:

  1. Describing Physical Attributes: Used to describe the size or presence of an object, building, or person.
    • “Le château était assez imposant, dominant le paysage alentour.” (The castle was quite imposing, dominating the surrounding landscape.)
  2. Describing Personality or Influence: Can also refer to someone’s personality, indicating that they have a strong or influential presence.
    • “Son patron est assez imposant et peut être intimidant au premier abord.” (Her boss is quite imposing and can be intimidating at first.)

Cultural and Societal Implications:

  • Commanding Respect: An “assez imposant” figure or object often commands respect or attention, whether due to size, stature, or influence.
  • Can Be Positive or Negative: Depending on context, being described as “assez imposant” could be seen as a positive trait (indicating strength or capability) or a negative one (if it implies being overbearing or intimidating).

Connotations:

  • The phrase carries a sense of magnitude and presence. The connotations can vary from positive (impressive, commanding) to negative (overbearing, intimidating), depending on the context and the subject it is describing.

Examples:

  • “Il a une voix assez imposante qui capte l’attention de tout le monde.” (He has a quite imposing voice that captures everyone’s attention.)
  • “Cet arbre dans notre jardin est assez imposant, mais il fournit beaucoup d’ombre.” (This tree in our garden is quite imposing, but it provides a lot of shade.)

In Summary:

“Assez imposant” is used in French to describe something or someone that is quite impressive or commands attention due to their size, presence, or influence. The phrase can be used in a variety of contexts, from physical attributes to personality traits, and the connotations can range from positive to negative depending on the situation.

What does “faire du mal” mean?

“Faire du mal” is a French phrase that translates to “to hurt” or “to harm” in English. Here’s a more detailed look:

Literal and Colloquial Meaning:

  • Literal Translation: “Faire” means “to do” or “to make,” and “du mal” means “harm” or “pain.” So, literally, it translates to “to do harm” or “to make pain.”
  • Colloquial Usage: It is commonly used to describe causing physical or emotional pain to someone.

Usage and Context:

  1. Physical Harm: When someone physically hurts another person or creature.
    • “Tu lui as fait du mal quand tu l’as poussé.” (You hurt him when you pushed him.)
  2. Emotional Harm: Describing emotional pain or distress.
    • “Ses mots m’ont vraiment fait du mal.” (His words really hurt me.)
  3. General Harm: It can also refer to causing harm or damage in a broader sense.
    • “Fumer fait du mal à la santé.” (Smoking is harmful to health.)

Cultural and Societal Implications:

  • Empathy and Relationships: Understanding and acknowledging when someone “fait du mal” is crucial in personal relationships. It is an important part of empathy and maintaining healthy interactions.
  • Moral and Ethical Values: Culturally, causing harm to others is generally frowned upon, and “faire du mal” goes against societal values of kindness and respect.

Connotations:

  • Negative: The phrase inherently carries a negative connotation as it involves causing harm or pain.
  • Seriousness: The severity can range from minor to severe, depending on the context.

Examples:

  1. Physical: “Il ne voulait pas faire du mal, mais il a accidentellement cassé son jouet.” (He didn’t mean to hurt [him], but he accidentally broke his toy.)
  2. Emotional: “Ses paroles peuvent parfois faire du mal sans qu’il s’en rende compte.” (His words can sometimes hurt without him realizing it.)
  3. Apology: “Je suis désolé si je t’ai fait du mal.” (I am sorry if I hurt you.)

In Summary:

“Faire du mal” is a versatile phrase used in French to describe causing harm or pain, whether physical or emotional. It carries a negative connotation and highlights the importance of empathy and understanding in interpersonal relationships. Being aware of how one’s actions might “faire du mal” is crucial for maintaining healthy and respectful connections with others.

What is opening up for you?

Comment below with the words you thought you heard, where you struggled, where you surprised yourself, or what you thought about this clip. Every little bit inspires other learners, thank you for being that inspiration to others on their French fluency journey!

Improve your ear with this clip from Transfert. Diveinto words like “gros nounours”, “assez imposant”, and “faire du mal”. Can you hear them all in this clip? Use our fill in the blanks quiz to improve your ear for fast spoken French!

1 thought on “Transfert s01e22, Quiz 18: assez imposant”

  1. I can’t believe she used a liaison while starting an entirely new sentence (“nounours. il”) first time i’d ever heard that done and it really had me stumped.

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