Skip to content

Transfert s01e22, Quiz 19: bien évidemment

    I love the speed changes in this clip. It starts slow then dives into a real fast clip. There are three words she stumbles over and repeats at the end of the clip. What are you hearing? Dive into some helpful expressions in this clip.

    Learn French with a podcast snippet! This clip is is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    20 seconds, 55 words
    , ' ',, '(besje n'avais) ' '.
    ,euh ' ',,euh '(besje n'avais) ' '.
    papaavaitplusquemère,hommeeuhbarbuseulshommesqui m'intéressaient c'étaithommesbarbusbienévidemment,vieuxquemoibienévidemmentbienévidemment,mariéssouventeuh c'étaitparfaitparcequeça(besje n'avais) n'avaisbesoin m'engager.

    The above audio sample and transcription is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    of course

    What’s opening up for you with this clip?

    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    Mon papa avait 9 ans plus que ma mère, un homme euh barbu et les seuls hommes qui m’intéressaient c’était des hommes barbus bien évidemment, beaucoup plus vieux que moi bien évidemment bien évidemment, mariés le plus souvent et euh c’était parfait parce que comme ça (bes je n’avais) je n’avais pas besoin de m’engager.

    My dad was 9 years older than my mom, a man with a beard, and the only men I was interested in were men with beards, obviously much older than me, married most of the time, and that was perfect because then I didn’t have to commit.

    The above translation from Deepl

    What does “hommes barbus” mean?

    Translation and Usage

    • “Hommes”: Men
    • “Barbus”: Bearded (the adjective form related to beard, “barbe”)
    • “Hommes barbus”: Bearded men

    Examples

    1. “Les hommes barbus sont très à la mode en ce moment.” (Bearded men are very fashionable right now.)
    2. “Certains hommes barbus portent la barbe pour des raisons religieuses.” (Some bearded men wear beards for religious reasons.)
    3. “Il y a une compétition annuelle pour les hommes barbus, où ils montrent leurs barbes élaborées.” (There is an annual competition for bearded men, where they showcase their elaborate beards.)

    What does “bien évidemment” mean?

    This phrase is used to express that something is clear, apparent, or goes without saying. It’s a way of affirming or confirming something in a conversation.

    Context and Connotations

    • Assertiveness: Using “bien évidemment” adds emphasis and assertiveness to a statement. It’s stronger than just saying “évidemment.”
    • Formality: The phrase can be used in both formal and informal settings, but it does carry a certain level of formality and confidence.
    • Clarity: “Bien évidemment” is often used when the speaker believes that the information being shared is, or should be, clear and undisputed.

    Examples

    1. “Bien évidemment, je serai là pour te soutenir.”: Of course, I’ll be there to support you.
    2. “Bien évidemment, ces résultats doivent être vérifiés.”: Obviously, these results need to be verified.
    3. “Tu peux, bien évidemment, refuser cette offre si elle ne te convient pas.”: You can, of course, refuse this offer if it does not suit you.

    Societal Implications

    • Expectation of Agreement: Using “bien évidemment” can imply that the speaker expects the listener to agree or understand without need for further explanation.
    • Clarification: It can be used to clarify a point or ensure that the listener is on the same page.

    In Summary

    “Bien évidemment” is a French phrase used to express certainty, clarity, and obviousness in a statement. It carries an expectation that the listener agrees or understands the point being made. This phrase can be used in a variety of contexts and adds emphasis and assertiveness to a statement. Whether in formal or informal settings, “bien évidemment” helps to reinforce a point and ensure clarity in communication.

    What does “le plus souvent” mean?

    “Le plus souvent” is a French phrase that translates to “most often” or “usually” in English. It is used to describe the frequency of an action or occurrence, indicating that something happens more frequently than not.

    Examples:

    • “Je mange à la maison le plus souvent.” (I eat at home most often.)
    • “Le plus souvent, il prend le bus pour aller au travail.” (He usually takes the bus to go to work.)

    Context:

    • When to Use: Use “le plus souvent” when describing habitual actions or tendencies, to express that something is the most common occurrence in a set of possibilities.
    • Formality: This phrase can be used in both formal and informal settings.

    Synonyms:

    • “habituellement” (habitually)
    • “généralement” (generally)
    • “d’habitude” (usually)

    Idiomatic Usage:

    • “Le plus souvent” itself is not an idiom, but it is a fixed phrase used to talk about frequency.

    Cultural Notes:

    • Talking about habits and usual actions is common in French culture, as in many others. “Le plus souvent” provides a way to discuss these habitual actions with precision, indicating that while something might not always be the case, it is the prevailing trend.

    In summary, “le plus souvent” is a useful phrase in French for discussing habits, tendencies, and the general frequency of actions. It helps in providing context and clarity when talking about how often something occurs.

    What does “m’engager” mean?

    “M’engager” is a reflexive form of the French verb “engager,” which translates to “commit” or “engage” in English. When used reflexively, it means “to commit myself” or “to engage myself.”

    Examples:

    • “Je veux m’engager à apprendre une nouvelle langue cette année.” (I want to commit myself to learning a new language this year.)
    • “Il est important de bien réfléchir avant de s’engager dans une relation sérieuse.” (It is important to think carefully before committing to a serious relationship.)

    Context:

    • When to Use: Use “m’engager” when you want to express a personal commitment or engagement towards a cause, activity, or relationship.
    • Formality: This phrase can be used in both formal and informal settings.

    Synonyms:

    • “me consacrer à” (to dedicate myself to)
    • “me lier à” (to bind myself to)

    Variations:

    • “s’engager” (to commit oneself/engage oneself, used when referring to someone else or in a general sense)

    Cultural Notes:

    • Commitment is an important value in many French-speaking cultures, and being able to express personal commitment through phrases like “m’engager” is a valuable part of communication. It reflects a willingness to take responsibility and be accountable for one’s actions or choices.

    In summary, “m’engager” is a reflexive verb phrase that conveys a sense of personal commitment or engagement. It is versatile and can be used in various contexts to express a serious dedication to something or someone.

    What is opening up for you?

    Comment below with the words you thought you heard, where you struggled, where you surprised yourself, or what you thought about this clip. Every little bit inspires other learners, thank you for being that inspiration to others on their French fluency journey!

    I love the speed changes in this clip. It starts slow then dives into a real fast clip. There are three words she stumbles over and repeats at the end of the clip. What are you hearing? Dive into some helpful expressions in this clip.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *