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Transfert s01e22, Quiz 29: il est arrivé un moment

    Dive into this next clip of French in real life. Hear “il est arrivé un moment”, “ça ne me convenait plus”, “un petit peu moins excitant, un petit peu moins sympa” and “m’en dégager”. Take on the transcription of this clip and practice your French listening skills from beginner to advanced.

    Learn French with a podcast snippet! This clip is is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    14 seconds, 48 words
    ., ' ' '.
    Euh.estarrivémomentçaconvenaiteuhcommençaitexcitant,sympaeuhsavais 'su 'su 'dégager.
    Euh.Maisestarrivémomentçaneconvenaitplusparcequeeuhcommençaitàdevenirmoinsexcitant,moinssympaeuhnesavaisne n'aipassu n'aipassu m'endégager.

    The above audio sample and transcription is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    everyday life

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    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    Euh. Mais il est arrivé un momentça ne me convenait plus parce que euh ça commençait à devenir un petit peu moins excitant, un petit peu moins sympa et (euh et je ne savais je ne je n’ai pas su) je n’ai pas su m’en dégager.

    But there came a time when it didn’t suit me any more, because it was starting to become a little less exciting, a little less fun, and I didn’t know how to get out of it.

    The above translation from Deepl

    What does “il est arrivé un moment” mean?

    The phrase “il est arrivé un moment” translates to “there came a time” or “there was a moment” in English. It is used to signify that at a specific point in time, an event occurred or a situation reached a particular state.

    Usage and Context:

    This phrase is often used to introduce a significant point in a narrative or explanation, marking a turning point or a noteworthy event.

    Examples:

    • “Il est arrivé un moment où j’ai dû prendre une décision importante.” (There came a time when I had to make an important decision.)
    • “Il est arrivé un moment dans la soirée où tout le monde a commencé à danser.” (There was a moment in the evening when everyone started to dance.)

    When to Use:

    You might use “il est arrivé un moment” when you want to pinpoint a time when something changed or when an important event took place.

    Cultural Notes:

    This phrase is commonly used in storytelling or recounting past experiences in French. It sets the stage for a new development or a climax in a story, reflecting the French appreciation for good narrative structure.

    In Summary: “Il est arrivé un moment” is a phrase used to introduce a pivotal or significant moment in a story or conversation, indicating a change or important occurrence.

    What does “Ça ne me convenait plus” mean?

    “Ça ne me convenait plus” translates to “It no longer suited me” or “It wasn’t right for me anymore” in English. The phrase expresses that something, whether a situation, condition, or object, was no longer appropriate, satisfactory, or in alignment with one’s desires or needs.

    Usage and Context:

    This phrase is often used to indicate a change in preference, circumstance, or fit. It might relate to a job, a living situation, a relationship, or any aspect of life that once was a good fit but has ceased to be.

    Examples:

    • “J’ai changé de travail parce que l’ancien ne me convenait plus.” (I changed jobs because the old one no longer suited me.)
    • “Je suis déménagé; l’appartement ne me convenait plus.” (I moved; the apartment wasn’t right for me anymore.)

    When to Use:

    Use “Ça ne me convenait plus” when explaining why you’ve moved on from something or why you’ve made a significant change in your life.

    Cultural Notes:

    This kind of expression reflects a French perspective that is quite pragmatic about life changes, acknowledging that people’s needs and situations evolve over time.

    In Summary: “Ça ne me convenait plus” is used to articulate that a previously suitable situation or thing no longer meets one’s needs or preferences, explaining a departure or change from the status quo.

    What does “m’en dégager” mean?

    The phrase “m’en dégager” in French translates to “to free myself from it” or “to extricate myself from it” in English. It is used to express the action of removing oneself from a commitment, situation, or obligation.

    Usage and Context:

    This expression is used when someone wants to communicate that they have managed to get out of a situation that was possibly burdensome, troublesome, or no longer desirable.

    Examples:

    • “J’avais beaucoup de travail, mais j’ai réussi à m’en dégager pour venir à ta fête.” (I had a lot of work, but I managed to free myself from it to come to your party.)
    • “Cet engagement ne me plaisait plus, j’ai dû trouver un moyen de m’en dégager.” (I no longer liked this commitment, I had to find a way to extricate myself from it.)

    When to Use:

    You would use “m’en dégager” when discussing situations where you have released yourself from an obligation or commitment, especially if it was difficult or complicated to do so.

    Cultural Notes:

    In France, where personal freedom and the ability to enjoy life are highly valued, the ability to “se dégager” from unwanted commitments is often seen as a positive skill. This phrase might reflect a sense of relief and liberation.

    In Summary: “M’en dégager” is about the act of freeing oneself from an unwanted situation or commitment, emphasizing the autonomy and relief experienced upon doing so.

    What does “un petit peu moins excitant, un petit peu moins sympa” mean?

    This phrase literally translates to “a little less exciting, a little less nice” in English. It’s used to describe a comparative decrease in the level of excitement or pleasantness of something or someone.

    Usage and Context:

    You can use this phrase when you want to express that while something might still be positive, it’s not quite as good as it used to be or as you expected. The “petit peu” (a little bit) part softens the comparison, indicating a slight or modest decrease rather than a drastic one.

    Examples:

    • “Le film était bon, mais un petit peu moins excitant que je le pensais.” (The movie was good, but a little less exciting than I thought.)
    • “Il est toujours gentil, mais depuis peu, il est un petit peu moins sympa qu’avant.” (He’s still nice, but recently he’s been a little less nice than before.)

    When to Use:

    This phrase might be used in casual conversation when providing feedback or expressing a nuanced opinion about something. It’s a diplomatic way to convey disappointment or a mild critique without being too harsh.

    Cultural Notes:

    In France, such nuanced expressions are appreciated for their ability to convey subtlety in opinion. The French language has a rich set of expressions for articulating slight differences in quality or experience, reflecting the value placed on precision and diplomacy in communication.

    In Summary: The phrase “un petit peu moins excitant, un petit peu moins sympa” is used to gently communicate that something is not as good as expected or has decreased slightly in quality or enjoyability, reflecting the nuanced way French speakers often express their opinions.

    What is opening up for you?

    Comment below with the words you thought you heard, where you struggled, where you surprised yourself, or what you thought about this clip. Every little bit inspires other learners, thank you for being that inspiration to others on their French fluency journey!

    Dive into this next clip of French in real life. Hear “il est arrivé un moment”, “ça ne me convenait plus”, “un petit peu moins excitant, un petit peu moins sympa” and “m’en dégager”. Take on the transcription of this clip and practice your French listening skills from beginner to advanced.

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