Skip to content

Transfert s01e22, Quiz 30: j’ai pris la décision

    Can you follow everything in today’s clip? Take it on and listen for: “il est arrivé un moment”, “j’ai pris la décision”, and “le décès”. Follow along with our transcription quiz and fill in the blanks at your level!

    Learn French with a podcast snippet! This clip is is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    10 seconds, 34 words
    (,) '() -, '.
    (,)arrivémoment 'prisdécision(euhà) -coïncidédécès, c'étaitparfait.
    (Etdonc,euhilest)estarrivémoment j'aiprisdécisionpartir(euhà)aux -çaacoïncidédécèspère,donc c'étaitparfait.

    The above audio sample and transcription is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    I made a decision

    What’s opening up for you with this clip?

    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    (Et donc, euh il est) Il est arrivé un momentj’ai pris la décision de partir (euh à) aux États-Unis et ça a coïncidé avec le décès de mon père, donc c’était parfait.

    (And so, uh there’s) There came a time when I made the decision to move (uh to) the U.S. and it coincided with my father’s passing, so it was perfect.

    The above translation from Deepl

    What does “il est arrivé un moment” mean?

    “Il est arrivé un moment” translates to “there came a time” or “there was a moment” in English. It introduces a specific point in time when a notable change occurred or an event took place.

    Usage and Context:

    The phrase is typically used to highlight a pivotal or significant point in a narrative or discussion, often marking a turning point or the onset of a new development.

    Examples:

    • “Il est arrivé un moment où j’ai dû choisir entre deux options.” (There came a time when I had to choose between two options.)
    • “Il est arrivé un moment dans la réunion où tout le monde s’est mis d’accord.” (There was a moment in the meeting when everyone agreed.)

    When to Use:

    This phrase is appropriate when recounting past events, especially when reflecting on life changes, decisions, or moments of realization.

    Cultural Notes:

    In French storytelling, setting up a narrative with “il est arrivé un moment” is a common technique that prepares the listener for a significant part of the story. It’s akin to “once upon a time” in English, serving as a signal that something important is about to be shared.

    In Summary: “Il est arrivé un moment” is a phrase used to denote a particular time of significance in the past, often signaling a change or an important event in the speaker’s story.

    What does “j’ai pris la décision” mean?

    “J’ai pris la décision” translates to “I made the decision” in English. It’s a statement of personal action, indicating that the speaker has come to a conclusive choice after some consideration.

    Usage and Context:

    The phrase signifies a decisive moment where the speaker has resolved to follow a certain course of action. It reflects a moment of commitment to a chosen path.

    Examples:

    • “J’ai pris la décision de continuer mes études à l’étranger.” (I made the decision to continue my studies abroad.)
    • “Après avoir vu tous les faits, j’ai pris la décision de vendre la maison.” (After seeing all the facts, I made the decision to sell the house.)

    When to Use:

    You would use “j’ai pris la décision” when you want to express that you, personally, have reached a conclusion and are ready to act on it.

    Cultural Notes:

    The phrase carries weight in any context, as it signifies a clear and often impactful choice. It reflects the value placed on individual agency and responsibility in decision-making.

    In Summary:

    “J’ai pris la décision” is a declaration that the speaker has arrived at a definitive choice and is ready to proceed based on that decision. It underscores the speaker’s autonomy and the importance of the decision in their life.

    What does “le décès” mean?

    “Le décès” is the formal French term for “the death” of a person. While DeepL translates it as “the passing,” which is a softer, more euphemistic term for death in English, “le décès” is the straightforward, official word used in French.

    Usage and Context:

    “Le décès” is commonly used in formal contexts, such as legal documents, news reports, and official communications. It is less emotive than other terms that might be used in personal conversations.

    Examples:

    • “Nous avons appris le décès de Monsieur Dupont.” (We have learned of the death/passing of Mr. Dupont.)
    • “Le certificat de décès a été émis hier.” (The death certificate was issued yesterday.)

    When to Use:

    Use “le décès” when referring to the fact of someone’s death in a formal or official manner. It is not typically used to express condolences; in that context, softer expressions like “la disparition” (the passing away) might be more appropriate.

    Cultural Notes:

    Discussing death in France, as in many cultures, is a sensitive matter. “Le décès” is a respectful, neutral way to refer to the event without the emotional weight that other words might carry.

    In Summary: “Le décès” refers to the death of a person, often used in formal or official contexts. While it is a direct term, it serves to communicate the fact of death with respect and formality.

    What is opening up for you?

    Comment below with the words you thought you heard, where you struggled, where you surprised yourself, or what you thought about this clip. Every little bit inspires other learners, thank you for being that inspiration to others on their French fluency journey!

    Can you follow everything in today’s clip? Take it on and listen for: “il est arrivé un moment”, “j’ai pris la décision”, and “le décès”. Follow along with our transcription quiz and fill in the blanks at your level!

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *