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Transfert s01e22, Quiz 32: bon

    Improve your French listening skills with clips of fast French in real life. Take on this slower clip of French in real life, with all the stops and starts you’d expect. Can you pick up “bon, d’accord” and “on s’organise” in the clip? Listen and fill in the blanks with what you hear!

    Learn French with a podcast snippet! This clip is is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    19 seconds, 43 words
    ',, '., ',,
    Euhproblèmeeuh l'estomac,, d'accord.donc, s'organiseeuhdînerensemble,,euhjovialhumeur
    Euhaproblèmeeuh l'estomac,Bon, d'accord.donc, s'organisepetiteuhpetitdînerensemble,,quiesttoujourseuhquiestjovialquiestbonnehumeur

    The above audio sample and transcription is from Transfert s01ep22. We do not own the content. Listen to the entire episode here.

    well

    What’s opening up for you with this clip?

    The snippet in English

    Find a translation of this snippet here, how much of this did you hear?

    Euh Il a un problème de euh l’estomac, de de … Bon, d’accord. Et donc, on s’organise un petit euh un petit dîner ensemble, et mon père, qui est toujours très … euh qui est jovial et qui est de bonne humeur …

    Uh He has a problem with uh stomach, with … Well, okay. And so, we organize a little uh a little dinner together, and my father, who is always very … uh who is jovial and who is in a good mood …

    The above translation from Deepl

    What does “bon” mean?

    “Bon” generally means “good” in English, but when used as a filler word in French, its purpose changes. It’s similar to saying “well,” “okay,” or “right” in English, often used to signify a transition in conversation, to pause for thought, or to indicate the conclusion or next phase of a discussion.

    Examples:

    • Transition: “Bon, passons au sujet suivant.” (Well, let’s move on to the next topic.)
    • Thinking: “Bon, comment puis-je expliquer cela…” (Well, how can I explain this…)
    • Concluding: “Bon, c’est tout pour aujourd’hui.” (Alright, that’s all for today.)

    Usage:

    • Informal Settings: Commonly used in casual conversations.
    • Formal Contexts: Can be used in formal settings, but with more restraint.

    Cultural Notes:

    In France, “bon” as a filler word is incredibly common and versatile. It smooths transitions in dialogue, allows a moment to think, or indicates the speaker is moving to a new point. Its use is a normal part of speech and doesn’t usually diminish the formality of a discussion, although overuse might be seen as a lack of preparation or nervousness in very formal or professional settings.

    What does “on s’organise” mean?

    On s’organise un petit dîner” translates to “We’re organizing a small dinner” in English. This phrase is a casual and friendly way to suggest arranging a dinner, usually among friends or family. The key components here are “on s’organise,” meaning “we are organizing [ourselves],” and “un petit dîner,” which refers to a small or informal dinner.

    Reflexive Verb Usage

    In this phrase, “s’organiser” is a reflexive verb. Reflexive verbs in French are used when the subject and the object of a verb are the same; in this case, the group (“on”) is both organizing and participating in the dinner. The reflexive form adds a sense of personal involvement and collective effort in the activity.

    Cultural Context

    In French culture, organizing meals or get-togethers is a common social activity. Using the reflexive form in “on s’organise un petit dîner” implies a shared responsibility and participation in the event, which reflects the collaborative nature of French social interactions.

    Examples

    • “Ce weekend, on s’organise un petit dîner, tu viens ?” (“This weekend, we’re organizing a small dinner, are you coming?”)
    • “Avec les amis, on s’organise souvent un petit dîner pour se retrouver.” (“With friends, we often organize a small dinner to get together.”)

    Conclusion

    On s’organise un petit dîner” is a common, friendly phrase used in French to propose setting up a casual dinner gathering. It’s reflective of the collective and participatory aspect of French social culture.

    What is opening up for you?

    Comment below with the words you thought you heard, where you struggled, where you surprised yourself, or what you thought about this clip. Every little bit inspires other learners, thank you for being that inspiration to others on their French fluency journey!

    Improve your French listening skills with clips of fast French in real life. Take on this slower clip of French in real life, with all the stops and starts you’d expect. Can you pick up “bon, d’accord” and “on s’organise” in the clip? Listen and fill in the blanks with what you hear!

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